French legislative election, 1876

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French legislative election, 1876
France
1871 ←
20 February and 5 March 1876 → 1877

All 533 seats to the Chamber of Deputies
267 seats needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Julesferry.jpg LéonGambetta.jpg Prince Impérial, 1878, Londres, BNF Gallica.jpg
Leader Jules Ferry Léon Gambetta Napoléon, Prince Imperial
Party Republican Left Republican Union Bonapartist
Last election N/A 150 20
Seats won 193 98 76
Seat change Increase193 Decrease52 Increase56

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Dufaure.jpg Debrogli.jpg
Leader Jules Dufaure Duc de Broglie
Party Centre-Right Centre-left Orleanist
Last election N/A N/A 214
Seats won 54 48 40
Seat change Increase54 Increase48 Decrease174

  Seventh party
  Maréchal de Mac-Mahon.jpg
Leader Duc de Magenta
Party Legitimist
Last election 182
Seats won 24
Seat change Decrease158

Government before election

Louis Buffet
(Monarchists)

Elected Government

Jules Dufaure III
(Republicans)

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The 1876 general election to the Chamber of Deputies, the lower chamber of the National Assembly of the French Third Republic under the French Constitutional Laws of 1875, was held on 20 February and 5 March 1876.

The result was a victory for the Republicans. President Patrice MacMahon invited Jules Simon, who declared himself "resolutely republican and resolutely conservative", to form a government, but dismissed him on 16 May 1877, precipitating the Seize Mai crisis and further elections.[1]

75.90% of eligible voters voted.

Results[edit]

Parliamentary Groups[edit]

Affiliation Party Seats
Republicans
  Republican Union 98
  Republican Left[2] 193
  Centre-left[3] 48
  Centre-Right 54
Right
  Orleanists 40
  Bonapartists 76
  Legitimists 24
Total 533
  1. ^ Gildea, R., Children of the Revolution, London, 2008, p. 252-253
  2. ^ Supporters of Jules Ferry, including Jules Grévy, Jules Favre, and Jules Simon
  3. ^ Liberal supporters of the Republic

Sources[edit]