French people in Madagascar

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French people in Madagascar
Total population
123,954 (0.618% of total population)
Regions with significant populations
Antananarivo, Toamasina, Mahajanga, Antsiranana
Languages
French, Malagasy, Betsimisaraka
Religion
Roman Catholicism
Related ethnic groups
Franco-Mauritian, Franco-Seychellois, White African

There is a small but recognizable community of French people in Madagascar, of whom the vast majority are born in Madagascar and are descended from former settlers and colonists from France who settled in Madagascar during the 19th and 20th centuries.[1] They constitute a minority ethnic group of Madagascar.

History[edit]


Society[edit]

Religious affiliation[edit]

87% of the French population in Madagascar are Christian adherents. The vast majority of French Christian adherents in Madagascar are Roman Catholic. A small number are Protestant. The remainder of French people residing in Madagascar are mostly non-religious, but a small minority are Jews.

Language[edit]

The majority of the French population in Madagascar speak French as their first language. However, some also speak various local languages, such as Malagasy, or dialects such as Plateau Malagasy and Betsimisaraka Malagasy.[1]

Education[edit]

Preschool (maternelle) through senior high school (lycée):

Preschool (maternelle) through junior high school (collège):

Junior high school (collège):

Preschool (maternelle) through primary school (primaire):

Former schools:

  • École française du lac Alaotra in Ambatondrazaka – Preschool to primary school[19]
  • École de l'Alliance in Morondava – Preschool to primary school[20]
  • École de la Francophonie in Anantanarivo, preschool through primary school[21]
  • École Sully in Anantanrivo, preschool through primary school[22]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ethnologue, 'Languages of Madagascar', http://www.ethnologue.com/show_country.asp?name=MG, Accessed: 28 July 2009
  2. ^ "École de l'Alliance française d'Antsahabe." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  3. ^ "Lycée Peter Pan." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  4. ^ "Collège français Jules-Verne." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  5. ^ "Lycée français Sadi-Carnot." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  6. ^ "Lycée français Sadi Carnot." AEFE. 15 October 2005. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  7. ^ "Collège français René-Cassin." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  8. ^ "Collège français Françoise-Dolto." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  9. ^ "Collège Étienne-de-Flacourt." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  10. ^ "École La Clairefontaine." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  11. ^ "Home." Lycée La Clairefontaine (main). Retrieved on 6 July 2018.
  12. ^ "École Bird." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  13. ^ "École primaire française Charles-Baudelaire." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  14. ^ "École primaire française d'Antalaha." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  15. ^ "École primaire française de Fort-Dauphin." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  16. ^ "École primaire française Les Pangalanes." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  17. ^ "École primaire française de Mananjary." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  18. ^ "École primaire française Lamartine." AEFE. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  19. ^ "Ecole française du lac Alaotra." AEFE. 26 January 2015. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  20. ^ "École de l'Alliance." AEFE. 26 January 2015. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  21. ^ "École de la Francophonie." AEFE. 12 April 2015. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.
  22. ^ "École Sully." AEFE. 15 October 2005. Retrieved on 5 July 2018.

External links[edit]