Friends Meetinghouse and School

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Friends Meetinghouse and School
Quaker Meeting Boerum Scherm jeh.JPG
1857 meetinghouse at 110 Schermerhorn Street (November 2008)
Friends Meetinghouse and School is located in New York City
Friends Meetinghouse and School
Friends Meetinghouse and School is located in New York
Friends Meetinghouse and School
Friends Meetinghouse and School is located in the US
Friends Meetinghouse and School
Location 110 Schermerhorn Street
Brooklyn, New York City
Coordinates 40°41′24″N 73°59′23″W / 40.69000°N 73.98972°W / 40.69000; -73.98972Coordinates: 40°41′24″N 73°59′23″W / 40.69000°N 73.98972°W / 40.69000; -73.98972
Built 1857
Architect Charles T. Bunting (attributed)[2]
William Tubby
Architectural style Classical Revival, Greek Revival
NRHP Reference # 82001179[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP November 4, 1982
Designated NYCL October 27, 1981

The Friends Meetinghouse and School is an historic Quaker meeting house and adjacent school building at the corner of Schermerhorn Street and Boerum Place in the Boerum Hill neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York City.

The school at 112 Schermerhorn St. was built in 1902

The meeting house, at 110 Schermerhorn Street, was built in 1857 and is a 3 1/2-story building built of red brick with brownstone details. Its design is attributed to Charles T. Bunting.[3]

The school, located at 112 Schermerhorn Street, was built in 1902 and is a three-story red brick building located adjacent to the meeting house, at 112 Schermerhorn Street. It was designed by William Tubby, a prominent Brooklyn architect,[3] to house the Brooklyn Friends School. Tubby was himself a Quaker and an early graduate of the school.[4]

The meeting house remains in regular use as a house of worship by the Brooklyn Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends.[5] The Brooklyn Friends School moved to another site nearby in 1973.[6] As of 2015, the school building houses Brooklyn Frontiers High School, an alternative school operated by the New York City Department of Education.

The meeting house was designated a New York City landmark in 1981,[2] and the meeting house and school together were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.[1]

References[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b Dibble, James E. (October 27, 1981). "Friends Meeting House (designation report)" (PDF). New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Retrieved 3 January 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Anne B. Covell (September 1982). "National Register of Historic Places Registration:Friends Meetinghouse and School". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2011-02-20.  See also: "Accompanying three photos". 
  4. ^ "William Bunker Tubby - the first architect of BFS". The Blue and Gray. Brooklyn Friends School. 
  5. ^ "Brooklyn Monthly Meeting". Brooklyn Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends. Retrieved 3 January 2015. 
  6. ^ Martin, John R. "A New Adventure Begins on Pearl Street". The Brooklyn Friends School Archives. Brooklyn Friends School. Retrieved 3 January 2015. 

External links[edit]