Frits Korthals Altes

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Frits Korthals Altes
Frits Korthals Altes.jpg
Frits Korthals Altes in 2001
President of the Senate
In office
11 March 1997 – 2 October 2001
Preceded byHerman Tjeenk Willink
Succeeded byGerrit Braks
Parliamentary leader in the Senate
In office
13 June 1995 – 11 March 1997
Preceded byDavid Luteijn
Succeeded byLeendert Ginjaar
Parliamentary groupPeople's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Member of the House of Representatives
In office
14 September 1989 – 11 June 1991
Parliamentary groupPeople's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Minister of the Interior
In office
26 January 1987 – 3 February 1987
Ad interim
Prime MinisterRuud Lubbers
Preceded byKees van Dijk
Succeeded byJan de Koning (Ad interim)
In office
20 February 1986 – 12 March 1986
Ad interim
Prime MinisterRuud Lubbers
Preceded byKoos Rietkerk
Succeeded byRudolf de Korte
Minister of Justice
In office
4 November 1982 – 7 November 1989
Prime MinisterRuud Lubbers
Preceded byJob de Ruiter
Succeeded byErnst Hirsch Ballin
Member of the Senate
In office
11 June 1991 – 2 October 2001
In office
10 June 1981 – 4 November 1982
Parliamentary groupPeople's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
Chairman of the People's Party
for Freedom and Democracy
In office
15 March 1975 – 22 May 1981
LeaderHans Wiegel
Preceded byHaya van Someren
Succeeded byJan Kamminga
Personal details
Born
Frederik Korthals Altes

(1931-05-15) 15 May 1931 (age 88)
Amsterdam, Netherlands
NationalityDutch
Political partyPeople's Party for
Freedom and Democracy

(from 1956)
Spouse(s)
Titia Kist
(m. 1965; div. 1985)

Hendrika Matthijssen (m. 1985)
Children3 sons
ResidenceRotterdam, Netherlands
Alma materLeiden University
(Bachelor of Laws, Master of Laws)
OccupationPolitician · Jurist · Lawyer · Corporate director · Nonprofit director · Editor · Author

Frederik "Frits" Korthals Altes (born 15 May 1931) is a retired Dutch politician of the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy (VVD) and jurist. He was granted the honorary title of Minister of State on 26 October 2001.

Korthals Altes attended the Barlaeus Gymnasium in Amsterdam from June 1937 until July 1943 and applied at the Leiden University in June 1951 majoring in Law and obtaining an Bachelor of Laws degree in June 1953 before graduating with an Master of Laws degree in July 1957. Korthals Altes worked as a lawyer in Rotterdam from August 1957 until November 1982. Korthals Altes served as Chairman of the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy from 15 March 1975 until 22 May 1981. Korthals Altes was elected as a Member of the Senate after the Senate election of 1981, taking office on 10 June 1981. After the election of 1982 Korthals Altes was appointed as Minister of Justice in the Cabinet Lubbers I, taking office on 4 November 1982. Korthals Altes served as acting Minister of the Interior from 20 February 1986 until 12 March 1986 following the death of Koos Rietkerk. After the election of 1986 Korthals Altes continued as Minister of Justice in the Cabinet Lubbers II, taking office on 14 July 1986. Korthals Altes again served as acting Minister of the Interior from 26 January 1987 until 3 February 1987 during a medical leave of absence of Kees van Dijk until Minister of Social Affairs and Employment Jan de Koning took over as acting Minister of the Interior. Korthals Altes was elected as a Member of the House of Representatives after the election of 1986, taking office on 14 September 1989. The Cabinet Lubbers II was replaced by the Cabinet Lubbers III on 7 November 1989 and he continued to serve in the House of Representatives as a frontbencher.

In April 1991 Korthals Altes announced that he wanted tot return to the Senate. After the Senate election of 1991 Korthals Altes was elected again as a Member of the Senate, he resigned as a Member of the House of Representatives the day he was installed as a Member of the Senate, taking office on 11 June 1991 serving as a frontbencher chairing several parliamentary committees. Korthals Altes also became active in the private sector and public sector and occupied numerous seats as a corporate director and nonprofit director on several boards of directors and supervisory boards (Unilever, KPN, Randstad Holding, Arcadis, Carnegie Foundation, Stichting INGKA Foundation, and the Institute of International Relations Clingendael) and served on several state commissions and councils on behalf of the government. Following the Senate election of 1991 Korthals Altes was selected as Parliamentary leader of the People's Party for Freedom and Democracy in the Senate, taking office on 13 June 1995. Korthals Altes was nominated as President of the Senate following the appointed of Herman Tjeenk Willink as Vice-President of the Council of State, taking office on 11 March 1997. In September 2001 Korthals Altes announced his retirement from national politics. He resigned as President of the Senate and a Member of the Senate on 2 October 2001.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Frederik Korthals Altes was born on 15 May 1931 in Amsterdam. He worked as a lawyer from 1957 until 1982.

Politics[edit]

After the second Lubbers cabinet fell because of a parliamentary motion of no confidence by the VVD faction, new elections were called, and Korthals Altes was elected to the Dutch House of Representatives. In 1991, he was elected back again to the Dutch Senate, where he became a Chairman of the Senate in 1997. From 1990 to 1997, he was also practising law again, with the Dutch firm Nauta Dutilh.

With his resignation from the senate in 2001, he was nominated as Minister of State. Earlier in 1997, the VVD gave him an honorary membership. From 1997 until 2001, he was President of the Senate. The Dutch Queen nominated Korthals Altes, alongside Rein Jan Hoekstra (CDA), as informateur, after a first round of talks between the CDA and Labour Party (PvdA) to form a new cabinet failed. The second Balkenende cabinet between the VVD, CDA and D66, was installed in May 2003.

Korthals Altes chaired a commission in 2007 that looked into the Dutch election process. The final report of the commission advised the government to abandon electronic voting machines, as they lack a paper trail.

Decorations[edit]

Honours
Ribbon bar Honour Country Date Comment
Ordre de la couronne de Chene GC ribbon.svg Grand Cross of the Order of the Oak Crown Luxembourg 15 November 1983
Legion Honneur GO ribbon.svg Grand Officer of the Legion of Honour France 6 February 1984
GER Bundesverdienstkreuz 7 Grosskreuz.svg Grand Cross 1st Class of the Order of Merit Germany 30 May 1985
BEL Kroonorde Grootkruis BAR.svg Grand Cross of the Order of the Crown Belgium 6 July 1986
POR Ordem do Merito Gra-Cruz BAR.svg Grand Cross of the Order of Merit Portugal 2 October 1989
NLD Order of Orange-Nassau - Commander BAR.png Commander of the Order of Orange-Nassau Netherlands 20 November 1989 Elevated from Officer (13 May 1981)
ESP Isabella Catholic Order GC.svg Knight Grand Cross of the Order of Isabella the Catholic Spain 1 December 1998
Ordre national du Merite GC ribbon.svg Grand Cross of the National Order of Merit France 28 February 2000
JPN Zuiho-sho 1Class BAR.svg Grand Cordon of the Order of the Sacred Treasure Japan 12 May 2000
Awards
Ribbon bar Awards Organization Date Comment
Volkspartij voor Vrijheid en Democratie (nl) Logo.svg Honorary Member People's Party for
Freedom and Democracy
23 May 1997
Honorific Titles
Ribbon bar Honour Country Date Comment
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Minister of State Netherlands 26 October 2001 Style of Excellency

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Official
Party political offices
Preceded by
Haya van Someren
Chairman of the People's Party
for Freedom and Democracy

1975–1981
Succeeded by
Jan Kamminga
Preceded by
David Luteijn
Parliamentary leader of the
People's Party for Freedom and Democracy
in the Senate

1995–1997
Succeeded by
Leendert Ginjaar
Political offices
Preceded by
Job de Ruiter
Minister of Justice
1982–1989
Succeeded by
Ernst Hirsch Ballin
Preceded by
Koos Rietkerk
Minister of the Interior
Ad interim

1986
1987
Succeeded by
Rudolf de Korte
Preceded by
Kees van Dijk
Succeeded by
Jan de Koning
Ad interim
Preceded by
Herman Tjeenk Willink
President of the Senate
1997–2001
Succeeded by
Gerrit Braks