Fucose

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L-Fucose
L-Fucose pyranose chemical structure.png
L-Fucose chemical structure.png
Identifiers
CAS number 2438-80-4 YesY
PubChem 17106
ChemSpider 16190 YesY
UNII 28RYY2IV3F YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:2181 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL469449 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C6H12O5
Molar mass 164.16
Supplementary data page
Structure and
properties
n, εr, etc.
Thermodynamic
data
Phase behaviour
Solid, liquid, gas
Spectral data UV, IR, NMR, MS
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 YesY (verify) (what is: YesY/N?)
Infobox references

Fucose is a hexose deoxy sugar with the chemical formula C6H12O5. It is found on N-linked glycans on the mammalian, insect and plant cell surface, and is the fundamental sub-unit of the fucoidan polysaccharide. α(1→3) linked core fucose is a suspected carbohydrate antigen for IgE-mediated allergy.[1]

Two structural features distinguish fucose from other six-carbon sugars present in mammals: the lack of a hydroxyl group on the carbon at the 6-position (C-6) and the L-configuration. It is equivalent to 6-deoxy-L-galactose.

In the fucose-containing glycan structures, fucosylated glycans, fucose can exist as a terminal modification or serve as an attachment point for adding other sugars.[2] In human N-linked glycans, fucose is most commonly linked α-1,6 to the reducing terminal β-N-acetylglucosamine. However, fucose at the non-reducing termini linked α-1,2 to galactose forms the H antigen, the substructure of the A and B blood group antigens.

Fucose is released from fucose-containing polymers by an enzyme called α-fucosidase.

L-Fucose is claimed to have application in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and dietary supplements.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Free review.png Daniel J. Becker; John B. Lowe (July 2003). "Fucose: biosynthesis and biological function in mammals". Glycobiology 13 (7): 41R–53R. doi:10.1093/glycob/cwg054. PMID 12651883. 
  2. ^ Free text.png Daniel J. Moloney; Robert S. Haltiwanger (July 1999). "The O-linked fucose glycosylation pathway: identification and characterization of a uridine diphosphoglucose: fucose-[beta]1,3-glucosyltransferase activity from Chinese hamster ovary cells". Glycobiology 9 (7): 679–687. doi:10.1093/glycob/9.7.679. PMID 10362837. 
  3. ^ Danisco Co. product literature.