Fujiwara no Koretada

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Fujiwara no Koretada
藤原伊尹
Imperial Regent of Japan
In office
June 26, 970 – December 1, 972
MonarchEn'yū
Preceded byFujiwara no Saneyori
Succeeded byFujiwara no Kaneie
Personal details
Born924
DiedDecember 9, 972(972-12-09) (aged 47–48)
Heian Kyō (Kyōto)
Spouse(s)Princess Keiko
ParentsFujiwara no Morosuke (father)
Fujiwara no Seishi (mother)

Fujiwara no Koretada (藤原 伊尹; 924 – December 9, 972), also known as Fujiwara no Koremasa or Kentokuko, Ichijō sesshō and Mikawa-kō, was a Japanese statesman, courtier, politician and waka-poet during the Heian period.[1]

His poems were published in "The Collected Poems of the First Ward Regent", Ichijo Sessho Gyoshu, and in Hyakunin Isshu (poem No. 45).

Career[edit]

Emperor Murakami named Koretada conservator of Japanese poetry in 951.[2]

Koretada served as a minister during the reign of Emperor En'yū.

  • 970 (Tenroku 1, 1st month): Koretada is named udaijin.[3]
  • 970 (Tenroku 1, 5th month): After the death of Fujiwara no Saneyori, Koretada is named sesshō (regent).[4]
  • 971 (Tenroku 2, 11th month): Koretada assumes the office of daijō daijin.[3]
  • 972 (Tenroku 3, 5th day of the 1st month): The enthronement of Emperor En'yu is supervised by Koretada.[5]
  • 972 (Tenroku 3, 11th month): Koretada died at age 49; and he was posthumously raised to first class rank. He was granted the posthumous title of Mikawa-kō. [5]

The immediate consequence of Koretada's death was a period of intense rivalry between his brothers Kanemichi and Kaneie.[6]

Genealogy[edit]

This member of the Fujiwara clan was the son of Morosuke.[1] He was the oldest son; and became head of the Hokke branch of the clan after his uncle Saneyori died in 970.

Koretada had four brothers: Kaneie,[7] Kanemichi,[8] Kinsue,[9] and Tamemitsu.[6]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Fujiwara no Tokihira" in Japan Encyclopedia, p. 203, p. 203, at Google Books; Brinkley, Frank et al. (1915). A History of the Japanese People from the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era, p. 203., p. 203, at Google Books
  2. ^ Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). Annales des empereurs du japon, p. 140, p. 140, at Google Books; see "Fousiwara-no I tada", pre-Hepburn romanization
  3. ^ a b Titsingh, p. 144., p. 144, at Google Books
  4. ^ Brinkley, p. 259., p. 259, at Google Books; Titsingh, p. 144., p. 144, at Google Books
  5. ^ a b Titsingh, p. 145., p. 145, at Google Books
  6. ^ a b Brinkley, p. 259., p. 259, at Google Books
  7. ^ Nussbaum, "Fujiwara no Kaneie" at p. 203, p. 203, at Google Books
  8. ^ Nussbaum, "Fujiwara no Kanemichi" at p. 203, p. 203, at Google Books
  9. ^ Nussbaum, "Fujiwara no Kinsue" at p. 204, p. 204, at Google Books

References[edit]

  • Brinkley, Frank and Dairoku Kikuchi. (1915). A History of the Japanese People from the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era. New York: Encyclopædia Britannica. OCLC 413099
  • Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric and Käthe Roth. (2005). Japan encyclopedia. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. ISBN 978-0-674-01753-5; OCLC 58053128
  • Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). Nihon Odai Ichiran; ou, Annales des empereurs du Japon. Paris: Royal Asiatic Society, Oriental Translation Fund of Great Britain and Ireland. OCLC 5850691