Fulla Nayak

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Fulla Nayak (died 18 November 2006)[1] was an Indian woman who was claimed to have died aged 150, which would make her the oldest woman ever. Due to the lack of a birth certificate, her true age could not be reliably established.

Claim of old age[edit]

Fulla Nayak, who lived in Kanarpur, a village in the Indian state of Odisha, rose to prominence in November 2006, only a few days prior to her death. The Times of India and the Indo-Asian News Service reported that Nayak's then 72-year-old grandson aimed at having his grandmother's alleged age of 125 acknowledged by Guinness World Records, which would make her the oldest woman to have ever lived.[2][3][4] At that time, two of Fulla Nayak's four daughters were still alive,[1] aged 80 and 92, respectively.[4]

According to her voters' ID[specify] (which had been issued in 1995), Fulla Nayak died aged 120.[1] As a birth certificate could not be provided,[4] there were no authoritative means to determine her age, so that the supposed record was not accepted.

Drug use icon[edit]

In the Times of India portrait of Fulla Nayak, it was reported that she was drinking palm wine and smoking ganja and beedis on a regular basis.[2] This story was picked up and spread worldwide, turning it into a supportive anecdote for drug liberalization campaigners that is used until today.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "India's oldest woman dead at 125". Daily News and Analysis. 19 November 2006. Retrieved 7 September 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Senapati, Ashis (13 November 2006). "At 120, a place in Guinness?". The Times of India. Retrieved 7 September 2013. 
  3. ^ "Orissa woman at 125 among oldest in India". Daily News and Analysis. 14 November 2006. Retrieved 7 September 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c Karan, Jajati (16 November 2006). "Oldest lady in Orissa is 'Fulla' life". CNN-IBN. Retrieved 7 September 2013. 
  5. ^ "125 Jahre alte Frau sagte, Cannabis wäre ihr Altersgeheimnis" (in German). 8 July 2011. Retrieved 7 September 2013.