Fully Integrated Robotised Engine

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Fully Integrated Robotised Engine
Fiat Fire engine.jpg
Overview
Manufacturer
Also called
  • FIRE
  • Starjet
  • Super-FIRE
  • T-Jet
Production
  • 1985-present (Fiat)
  • 2009-present (Chrysler)
Layout
Configuration Straight-4
Displacement
  • 769 cc (46.9 cu in)
  • 999 cc (61.0 cu in)
  • 1,108 cc (67.6 cu in)
  • 1,242 cc (75.8 cu in)
  • 1,368 cc (83.5 cu in)
Cylinder bore
  • 65 mm (2.6 in)
  • 70 mm (2.8 in)
  • 70.8 mm (2.79 in)
  • 72 mm (2.8 in)
Piston stroke
  • 58 mm (2.3 in)
  • 64.9 mm (2.56 in)
  • 72 mm (2.8 in)
  • 78.9 mm (3.11 in)
  • 84 mm (3.3 in)
Cylinder block alloy Cast iron
Cylinder head alloy Aluminum
Valvetrain
Combustion
Fuel system
Fuel type
Oil system Wet sump
Cooling system Water cooled

The FIRE (for "Fully Integrated Robotised Engine") is a series of automobile engines from Fiat Powertrain Technologies, built in FCA's Termoli, Betim and also in Dundee, MI (only in 1.4 Multiair versions) plants. It was designed by Italian design firm Rodolfo Bonetto.[1] It is constructed by robot assembly plants ("Robogate") to reduce costs.

The FIRE series replaced the old Fiat 100 series OHV engines in the mid-1980s. Mechanically, they are simple straight-4 engines with five main bearings crankshaft and overhead cam heads.

Since 1985, it has been constructed in different versions from 769 cc to 1368 cc with 8 valves; there is another version called the "Super-FIRE" which uses 16 valves and is available in 999 cc (Brazil) and 1242 cc (Brazil & Europe) displacements.

The 1368 cc variation introduced in 2003 is available in both 8 and 16 valves. In 2005 Fiat introduced a version of the 16v incorporating port deactivation (PDA) and EGR. This unit is frequently referred to as the "Starjet" engine. One year later, a turbocharged variety of the Starjet was introduced under the name "T-Jet", and a MultiAir (adding electro-hydraulic intake valve driving, with variable timing, lift and profile) version was added in 2009, available in either naturally aspirated and turbocharged forms.

The FIRE was originally a carburetor engine, and later progressed to single point injection (SPI), then to multipoint injection (MPI), using sequential multipoint injection (SMPI) today. It is now used in the 750 Formula in a slightly modified state.

List of FIRE engines[edit]

The FIRE engine has been available in the following displacements:

  • 769 cc (0.8 L) - 65 mm bore x 58 mm stroke
    • 8V 34 PS (1986 - 1992)
  • 999 cc (1.0 L) - 70 mm bore x 64.9 mm stroke
    • 8V 45 PS (1986 - 1993)
    • 8V SPI 45 PS (1987 - 2003)
    • 16V SMPI 60 PS (1998 - 2003, Brazil only)
    • 8V SMPI Flex-fuel 77 PS (2005 - current, Brazil only)
  • 1108 cc (1.1 L) - 70 mm bore x 72 mm stroke
    • 8V 55 PS (1983 - 1993)
    • 8V SPI 50-55 PS (1993 - 2000)
    • 8V SMPI 55 PS (2001 - current)
  • 1242 cc (1.2 L) - 70.8 mm bore x 78.9 mm stroke
    • 8V SPI 60 PS (1993 - 1999)
    • 8V MPI 75 PS (1993 - 1999)
    • 8V SMPI 60 PS (1993 - 2009)
    • 8V SMPI VVT 69 PS (2007 - current)
    • 16V SMPI 80-86 PS (1998 - 2009)
  • 1368 cc (1.4 L) SMPI - 72 mm bore x 84 mm stroke
    • 8V SMPI 77 PS (2003 - current)
    • 8V SMPI VVT 77 PS (2005 - current)
    • 8V SMPI Flex-fuel 90 PS (2005 - current, Brazil only)
    • 16V SMPI 95 PS (2005 - current)
    • 16V SMPI StarJet VVTPDA 90-95 PS (2005 - current)
    • 16V T-Jet 105-120-155 PS (2006 - current)
    • 16V MultiAir 105 PS (2009 - current)
    • 16V MultiAir Turbo 130-170 PS (2009 - current)

Applications[edit]

Production[edit]

As part of the June 10, 2009 Operating Agreement, Chrysler's commercial production of Fully Integrated Robotized Engine began in its Dundee, Michigan facility.[2][3] Chrysler's first FIRE engine model, a 100 hp 1.4-liter FIRE with Multiair engine, was first introduced in Fiat 500 starting in 2010.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]