Fumio Kishida

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Fumio Kishida
岸田 文雄
Fumio Kishida Minister.jpg
Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
26 December 2012 – 3 August 2017
Prime MinisterShinzō Abe
Preceded byKōichirō Genba
Succeeded byTarō Kōno
Acting Minister of Defense
In office
28 July 2017 – 3 August 2017
Prime MinisterShinzō Abe
Preceded byTomomi Inada
Succeeded byItsunori Onodera
Minister of State for Consummers
In office
18 June 2008 – 1 August 2008
Prime MinisterYasuo Fukuda
Preceded byOffice created
Succeeded bySeiko Noda
Minister of State for Space
In office
6 February 2008 – 1 August 2008
Prime MinisterYasuo Fukuda
Preceded byOffice created
Succeeded bySeiko Noda
Minister of State for Okinawa and the Northern Territories
In office
27 August 2007 – 1 August 2008
Prime MinisterShinzō Abe
Yasuo Fukuda
Preceded bySanae Takaichi
Succeeded byMotoo Hayashi
Minister of State for Regulatory Reform
In office
27 August 2007 – 1 August 2008
Prime MinisterShinzō Abe
Yasuo Fukuda
Preceded byYoshimi Watanabe
Succeeded byKaoru Yosano
Minister of State for Science, Technology and Quality of Life
In office
27 August 2007 – 1 August 2008
Prime MinisterShinzō Abe
Yasuo Fukuda
Preceded byOffice created
Succeeded bySeiko Noda
Member of the House of Representatives
Assumed office
18 July 1993
ConstituencyHiroshima 1st district
Personal details
Born (1957-07-29) 29 July 1957 (age 63)
Hiroshima, Japan
Political partyLiberal Democratic Party
Alma materWaseda University

Fumio Kishida (岸田 文雄, Kishida Fumio, born 29 July 1957) is a Japanese politician and the former Minister for Foreign Affairs of Japan from 2012 to 2017. He is a member of the House of Representatives and the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP). He served in Yasuo Fukuda's cabinet as minister of state for Okinawa and northern territories affairs, science and technology policy, quality-of-life policy, and regulatory reform. Within the LDP, Kishida is associated with more moderate viewpoints.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Kishida was born to a political family in Minami-ku, Hiroshima on 29 July 1957.[2][3] His father and grandfather were former politicians who were lower house members, and also, former prime minister Kiichi Miyazawa is a distant relative of his.[3]

Kishida studied law at Waseda University and graduated in 1982.[2] At Waseda, he was friends with future politician Takeshi Iwaya.[4]

Political career[edit]

After working at now-defunct Long-Term Credit Bank of Japan and then as a secretary to a member of the House of Representatives, Kishida was elected to the House of Representatives in the 1993 general election, representing the Hiroshima 1st district.[5]

He was close to LDP faction leader Makoto Koga,[3] and assumed control of Koga's faction in October 2012.[3]

Like Shinzō Abe and most members of his Cabinet, Kishida is affiliated to the openly nationalist organization Nippon Kaigi.[6]

Kishida served as Minister of Okinawa Affairs from 2007 to 2008, firstly in the Abe Cabinet and later in the Fukuda cabinet.[7] He was appointed state minister in charge of consumer affairs and food safety in the cabinet of then prime minister Yasuo Fukuda in 2008.[3] Kishida was also state minister in charge of science and technology in the Fukuda cabinet.[7]

Abe government[edit]

Kishida with U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se, February 2017

Following the LDP's victory in the 2012 general election, Kishida was named foreign minister in the Cabinet of Prime Minister Shinzō Abe on 26 December 2012.[5][8] He became the longest-serving foreign minister in postwar history, unseating Abe's father Shintaro Abe.[9] He helped to arrange U.S. President Barack Obama's historic visit to Hiroshima in 2015, and gained attention in 2017 when he appeared alongside comedian Piko Taro to promote a UN program.[4]

In 2017, Kishida left the Cabinet to take over the chairmanship of the LDP Policy Research Council, a position traditionally seen as a stepping stone to leadership of the party.[10] He sought this position in order to improve his chances to succeed Abe, as the foreign minister post had relatively little influence within the party.[9]

Kishida considered running in the 2018 LDP presidential election, but he was persuaded by Abe not to run, with a suggestion that Abe would later support Kishida as his successor. By mid-2020, several senior LDP lawmakers had shifted their support from Kishida to Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga. Deputy Prime Minister Taro Aso was quoted as saying "Kishida is for peacetime, not for troubled times."[11] One factor in this shift was an unsuccessful proposal by Kishida to provide a 300,000 yen stimulus payment to households during the COVID-19 pandemic.[12] After Suga won the 2020 LDP presidential election and became Prime Minister, Kishida was not offered a position in the Suga cabinet, although his faction obtained two cabinet seats.[13]

Family[edit]

Both Kishida's grandfather, Masaki Kishida, and his father, Fumitake Kishida, were members of the House of Representatives, and his cousin is former Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry minister Yoichi Miyazawa.[14]

Honours[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harding, Robin (19 August 2020). "Shinzo Abe hospital visit stokes speculation over successor". Financial Times. Retrieved 19 August 2020.
  2. ^ a b "Fumio Kishida". Kante'. Retrieved 27 December 2012.
  3. ^ a b c d e "Profiles". The Japan Times. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  4. ^ a b Reynolds, Isabel (20 July 2017). "Abe's Low-Key Foreign Minister Watched as Potential Rival". Bloomberg.com. Retrieved 29 August 2020.
  5. ^ a b "Profiles of key ministers in Abe's new Cabinet". The Asahi Shimbun. 26 December 2012. Archived from the original on 25 January 2013. Retrieved 27 December 2012.
  6. ^ "Abe's reshuffle promotes right-wingers" (Korea Joongang Daily - 2014/09/05)
  7. ^ a b "Profile: Foreign Minister Kishida boasts background in Okinawa affairs". House of Japan. 27 December 2012. Archived from the original on 2 December 2013. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  8. ^ "Abe elected premier, launches Cabinet". Daily Yomuiru Online. 26 December 2012. Retrieved 3 January 2013.
  9. ^ a b Bosack, Michael (9 July 2018). "Will Kishida Challenge Abe's Leadership?". Tokyo Review. Retrieved 29 August 2020.
  10. ^ "Japanese Foreign Minister Kishida set to take key ruling party post: NHK". Reuters. 2 August 2017. Retrieved 29 August 2020.
  11. ^ "Doubts grow in LDP over Fumio Kishida's ability to succeed Abe". The Japan Times. 20 July 2020. Retrieved 29 August 2020.
  12. ^ Sakaguchi, Yukihiro (26 June 2020). "Race to replace Abe threatens stability of Japanese politics". Nikkei Asian Review. Retrieved 29 August 2020.
  13. ^ Bosack, Michael MacArthur (16 September 2020). "Breaking down Suga's picks for his first Cabinet". The Japan Times. Retrieved 16 September 2020.
  14. ^ "Japan minister support staff 'put sex club on expenses'". BBC. 23 October 2014. Retrieved 24 October 2014.
  15. ^ Decoraties Staatsbezoeken Japan en Republiek Korea Archived 4 November 2014 at the Wayback Machine - website of the Dutch Royal House

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Kōichirō Genba
Minister of Foreign Affairs
2012–2017
Succeeded by
Tarō Kōno
Preceded by
Tomomi Inada
Acting Minister of Defense
2017
Succeeded by
Itsunori Onodera