Fundamental Statute for the Secular Government of the States of the Church

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The Fundamental Statute for the Secular Government of the States of the Church was the constitution of the Papal States conceded by Pope Pius IX[1] as a result of the 1848 revolutions.[citation needed] It was published on 14 March 1848.[2]

The statute provided for two legislative chambers.[2] The first was to consist of members nominated for life by the Pope and the second, of one hundred elected deputies.[2] The laws adopted by these two chambers had first to undergo the scrutiny of the College of Cardinals, before being submitted to the Pope for his assent or rejection.[2] Ecclesiastical, or ecclesiastico-political, affairs were exempted from parliamentary interference.[2] Also the parliament was required to abstain from the enactment of laws conflicting with criticism of the diplomatic and religious relations of the Holy See with foreign powers.[2]


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Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Michaelides 2000, p. xxxvi.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Mirbt 1911, p. 688.

Bibliography[edit]

Michaelides, Chris (2000). Rome. World Bibliographical Series. 222. Oxford: Clio Press. ISBN 978-1-85109-315-1.
Mirbt, Carl Theodor (1911). "Pius IX" . In Chisholm, Hugh (ed.). Encyclopædia Britannica. 21. New York: Encyclopædia Britannica Company. pp. 687–690.