Fushan Temple

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Fushansi
Hok-san-sī
福山寺
Fushan Temple is located in Myanmar
Fushan Temple
Shown within Myanmar
Basic information
Location Kaba Aye Pagoda Road, Bahan Township, Yangon
Geographic coordinates 16°49′30.73″N 96°9′15.64″E / 16.8252028°N 96.1543444°E / 16.8252028; 96.1543444Coordinates: 16°49′30.73″N 96°9′15.64″E / 16.8252028°N 96.1543444°E / 16.8252028; 96.1543444
Affiliation Mahayana Buddhism
Deity Chó·-su-kong (Qingshui)
Country Burma
Completed January 1875; 143 years ago (1875-01)

Fushansi (Chinese: 福山寺; pinyin: Fúshān Sì; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Hok-san-sī; Burmese: ကုက္ကိုင်းဘုရားကျောင်း; also spelt Fu Shan Si or Fu Sun Si), located on Kaba Aye Pagoda Road in Bahan Township, Yangon, is a Mahayana Buddhist temple founded in January 1875 by overseas Chinese descended from Hoklo people from Anxi County, Fujian.[1][2] The temple is managed by Kheng Hock Keong in downtown Yangon. Fushansi is dedicated to a Chinese Buddhist monk named Chó·-su-kong (Chinese: 祖師公, also known as Qingshui Zushi) and was restored in 2008. Fushansi attracts many devotees especially during Chinese New Year and Qingsui Zu Shi's birthday.

The temple-tender, Mr. Yang, who said that he took part in its renovation in 1960, has managed the temple for many years. The temple compound includes a restaurant and a basketball court. There is also a small artificial body of water in the center of the compound, right in front of the entrance to the temple. The compound has become more of a Chinese park rather than a center of worship. The surrounding area includes traditional Chinese sculptures and architectural designs. There are also circular Chinese balconies with their stone-made tables and stools. Beside one of the balconies, there are statues from the Chinese zodiac and miniature versions of a Chinese bridge and tower.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chen, Yi-Sein (1966). "The Chinese in Rangoon during the 18th and 19th Centuries". Essays Offered to G. H. Luce by His Colleagues and Friends in Honour of His Seventy-Fifth Birthday. Volume 1: Papers on Asian History, Religion, Languages, Literature, Music Folklore, and Anthropology. Artibus Asiae Publishers. 23: 107–111. JSTOR 1522640.
  2. ^ http://www.chinatownology.com/Fushan_si.html

See also[edit]