Géo André

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Géo André
Géo André 1920.jpg
Géo André in 1920
Personal information
Full name Georges Yvan André
Born 13 August 1889
Paris, France
Died 4 May 1943(1943-05-04) (aged 53)
Mateur, Bizerte, Tunisia
Height 188 cm (6 ft 2 in)
Weight 85 kg (187 lb)
Sport
Sport Athletics
Event(s) Sprint, hurdles, high jump, decathlon
Club Stade français, Paris (−1908)
Racing Club de France, Paris (1909–)
Achievements and titles
Personal best(s) 100 m – 11.0 (1914)
200 m – 22.6 (1919)
400 m – 49.0 (1914)
110 mH – 15.4 (1922)
400 mH – 54.8e (1920)
HJ – 1.88 m (1908)[1][2]

Georges Yvan "Géo" André (13 August 1889 – 4 May 1943)[3] was a French track and field athlete and rugby union player. As an athlete he competed at the 1908, 1912, 1920 and 1924 Summer Olympics in various events, including long jump, high jump, 400 m sprint, 110 and 400 m hurdles, pentathlon and decathlon. He won a silver medal in the high jump in 1908 and a bronze in the 4 × 400 m relay in 1920, finishing fourth in the 400 m hurdles in 1920 and 1924 and fifth in the standing high jump in 1908. At the 1924 Olympics he took the Olympic Oath and served as the flag bearer for the French delegation.[1]

André won French titles in 110 m hurdles (1908, 1914, 1919, 1922), 400 m hurdles (1913–14, 1919–20, 1922), high jump (1907–1909, 1911, 1914, 1919), standing high jump (1909, 1911–12, 1914, 1919–20). He held national records in the 110 m hurdles (1908 – 15.8; 1922 – 15.4), 400 m hurdles (1913 – 57.0; 1920 – 57.0/56.0/55.6), high jump (1907 – 1.79; 1908 – 1.80/1.885), and 4 × 400 m relay (1922 – 3:24.0). In 1913–1914 he played for the national rugby team.[1]

André was wounded while serving as a fighter pilot in World War I. After retiring from competitions he worked as a sports journalist for several prominent French newspapers. During World War II he joined the infantry and was killed by German forces in 1943 in Tunis, aged 53. His son Jacques (1919–1988) competed as a hurdler at the 1948 Olympics.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Géo André. sports-reference.com
  2. ^ Georges André. trackfield.brinkster.net
  3. ^ Geo Andre rugby profile. ESPN Scrum.com

Further reading[edit]

  • Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2008). The Complete Book of the Olympics – 2008 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited. pp. 161, 182, 196–7.

External links[edit]