Günter Bernard

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Günter Bernard
Personal information
Full name Günter Bernard
Date of birth (1939-11-04) 4 November 1939 (age 77)
Place of birth Schweinfurt, Germany
Height 1.79 m (5 ft 10 12 in)
Playing position Goalkeeper
Youth career
1. FC Schweinfurt 05
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1958–1963 1. FC Schweinfurt 05 72 (0)
1963–1974 Werder Bremen 287 (0)
National team
1962–1968 West Germany 5 (0)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Günter Bernard (born 4 November 1939 in Schweinfurt, Germany) is a former German football player. He is the son of Robert Bernard (10 March 1913-1990), who was a German international football player himself.

A member of the 1966 FIFA World Cup squad of West Germany, Günter Bernard joined SV Werder Bremen in the founding year of Bundesliga from boyhood outfit Schweinfurt 05, for whom he had played top-tier matches in the Oberliga Süd since 1958. He stayed loyal to Bremen until his retirement in 1974 and was the clubs first-choice in their surprise Bundesliga winning campaign in 1965. He altogether played 287 times on that level for the North Germans.[1]

His West Germany career started with a youth call-up in 1961 that prompted Sepp Herberger to take him to the senior level a year later. Competing with Wolfgang Fahrian and Hans Tilkowski for the job in goal of West Germany at that time, Bernard made his first West Germany appearance under contract with Schweinfurt 05 on 24 October 1962. The Bundesliga trophy he won with Werder Bremen, three years later, helped him to achieve a spot in Helmut Schön's squad for the 1966 FIFA World Cup, but did not give him the competitive edge he had been longing for.[2] So Hans Tilkowski was the West German keeper at the tournament. Günter Bernard made his fifth and final game for West Germany as a substitute for Horst Wolter against Wales in 1968.

Honours[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Günter Bernard" (in German). fussballdaten.de. Retrieved 23 January 2010. 
  2. ^ "Guenter Bernard". FIFA. Retrieved 23 January 2010.