GER Class R24

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GER Class R24
LNER Class J67
Stratford Locomotive Yard geograph-2380095-by-Ben-Brooksbank.jpg
On a foggy January Saturday, 18 January 1947, Holden J67 0-6-0T No. 8590 of 1899, is struggling across a turntable with a string of dead locomotives (D15 'Claud' 4-4-0 No. 2509, J15 0-6-0 No. 5374 and D16/3 'Super Claud' 4-4-0 No. 2608).
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Designer James Holden
Builder Stratford Works
Build date 1890–1901
Total produced 140
Specifications
Configuration 0-6-0T
UIC classification C n2t
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Driver diameter 4 ft 0 in (1.219 m)
Wheelbase 13 ft 10 in (4.22 m)
Length 27 ft 8 in (8.43 m) over buffers
Locomotive weight 40 long tons 0 cwt (89,600 lb or 40.6 t)
Fuel type Coal
Fuel capacity 2 long tons 5 cwt (5,000 lb or 2.3 t)
Water capacity 1,000 imp gal (4,550 l; 1,200 US gal)
Boiler pressure 160 psi (1.10 MPa)
Firegrate area 12.4 sq ft (1.15 m2)
Heating surface:
– Total
987.4 sq ft (91.73 m2)
Cylinders Two, inside
Cylinder size 16 12 in × 22 in (419 mm × 559 mm)
Performance figures
Tractive effort 16,970 lbf (75.49 kN)
Career
Operator(s) GER » LNER » BR
Class GER: R24
LNER: J67
Power class BR: 2F
Axle load class LNER/BR: RA 3
Disposition 51 rebuilt to R24R, remainder withdrawn 1937–1961

The GER Class R24 was a class of 0-6-0 steam tank locomotives designed by James Holden for the Great Eastern Railway (GER). They passed to the London and North Eastern Railway at the grouping in 1923 and received the LNER classification J67. Some R24s were rebuilt with higher boiler pressure in which form they were similar to the later Class S56. The rebuilt R24s, together with the S56s, were classified J69 by the LNER.

History[edit]

These locomotives were very similar to the Class T18 locomotives, sharing the same dimensions for most major components. They were all built at the GER's Stratford Works between 1890 and 1901.[1]

Table of orders and numbers[2]
Year Order No. Quantity GER Nos. LNER No. LNER 1946 No. Notes
1890 R24 10 327–336 7327–7336 8490–8495, —, 8496–8498
1890 S24 10 337–346 7337–7346 8499–8505, —, 8507–8508
1890 A26 10 397–406 7397–7406 8509–8513, —, 8514, — 8515, —
1890–91 B26 10 407–416 7011–7020 8516–8521, —, 8522–8523, — Renumbered 11–20 in January 1920
1892 P29 10 347–356 7347–7356 8524–8533
1892 R29 10 357–366 7357–7366 8534–8538, — 8540, — 8541–8542
1894 N33 10 367–376 7367–7376 8543–8552
1895 F36 10 377–386 7377–7386 8553–8562
1895–96 Y36 10 387–396 7387–7396 8563, —, 8565–8572
1896 C37 10 265–274 7265–7274 8573–8579, — 8581, —
1899 H45 10 255–264 7255–7264 —, 8583–8585, —, 8586–8590
1899–1900 G47 10 199–208 7199–7208 —, 8606, —, —, 8591–8592, —, 8593–8595
1900 S48 10 189–198 7305, 7190–7198 8596–8603, —, 8605 189 renumbered 305 in January 1909
1901 R50 10 160–169 7160–7169 8607–8613, —, —, 8616

Eighty-nine locomotives were rebuilt between 1904 and 1921 with 180-pound-force-per-square-inch (1.24 MPa) boilers and increased water capacity. Most were fitted with air brakes and used in suburban and branch line passenger service alongside the Class S56. The 51 locomotives not rebuilt were used for shunting and working local goods trains.[3]

The first withdrawal was in 1931 due to accident damage.[4] Eleven were withdrawn in 1937, and one in 1939. Thirteen class J69 locomotives were lent to the War Department in October 1939,[5] of which eight had been built as Class R24. They were sold to the War Department in October 1940,[4] where they were used on the Melbourne and Longmoor Military Railways.[5] The remaining locomotives were renumbered 8490–8616 in order of construction (with one exception); however gaps were left where the locomotives sold to the War Department would have been. At nationalisation in 1948, they all passed to British Railways, who added 60000 to their number. Post-war withdrawals started in 1953, and by 1962 all had been retired.

Table of withdrawals
Year Quantity in
service at
start of year
Quantity
withdrawn
Locomotive numbers Notes
1931 140 1 7364 Accident damage
1937 139 11 7017, 7020, 7199, 7201, 7202, 7205, 7255, 7259, 7402, 7404, 7406
1939 128 1 7333
1940 127 8 7274, 7272, 7197, 7168, 7388, 7344, 7362, 7167 to WD 78–79, 81–82, 84, 88–90 respectively
1953 119 4 68505, 68525, 68533, 68548
1954 115 4 68493, 68509, 68534, 68572
1955 111 11
1956 100 13
1957 87 9
1958 78 22
1959 56 18
1960 38 12
1961 26 18
1962 8 8

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allen et al. 1970, p. 78
  2. ^ Aldrich 1969, pp. 101–102
  3. ^ Aldrich 1969, p. 102
  4. ^ a b Aldrich 1969, p. 103
  5. ^ a b Tourret 1995, p. 47
  • Aldrich, C. Langley (1969). The Locomotives of the Great Eastern Railway 1862–1962 (7th ed.). Wickford, Essex: C. Langley Aldrich. OCLC 30278831. 
  • Allen, D. W.; Boddy, M. G.; Brown, W. A.; Fry, E. V.; Hennigan, W.; Manners, F.; Neve, E.; Proud, P.; Roundthwaite, T. E.; Tee, D. F.; Yeadon, W. B. (November 1970). Fry, E. V., ed. Locomotives of the L.N.E.R., part 8A: Tank Engines - Classes J50 to J70. Kenilworth: RCTS. ISBN 0-901115-05-3. 
  • Tourret, R. (1995). Allied Military Locomotives of the Second World War. Abingdon, Oxon: Tourret Publishing. ISBN 0-905878-06-X. 
  • Ian Allan ABC of British Railways Locomotives, 1948 edition, part 4, pp 49–50

External links[edit]