GOES-G

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GOES-G
Goes-4.jpg
Artist's impression of an HS-371-derived GOES satellite
Mission type Weather satellite
Operator NOAA / NASA
Mission duration Failed to orbit
7 years (planned)
Spacecraft properties
Bus HS-371
Manufacturer Hughes
Launch mass 660 kilograms (1,460 lb)
Start of mission
Launch date 3 May 1986, 22:18 (1986-05-03UTC22:18Z) UTC[1]
Rocket Delta 3914 D178
Launch site Cape Canaveral LC-17A
Contractor McDonnell Douglas
Orbital parameters
Reference system Geocentric
Regime Geostationary
Epoch Planned

GOES-G was a weather satellite to be operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The satellite was designed to sense and monitor meteorological conditions from a geostationary orbit, intended to replace GOES-5 and provide continuous vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature and moisture. It was lost due to the launch failure of a Delta 3914 rocket on 3 May 1986.

Launch[edit]

GOES-G launch.
Explosion 71 seconds after launch.

Launch occurred on May 3, 1986 at 22:18 GMT,[2] aboard Delta 178, the first NASA launch following the Challenger disaster. Seventy-one seconds into the flight, the first stage main engine shut down prematurely due to an electrical fault, and the rocket was destroyed by range safety.

Legacy[edit]

In 2015, director Ridley Scott used the explosion to depict the launch failure of the IRIS craft, in "The Martian".[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ McDowell, Jonathan. "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 2009-12-23. 
  2. ^ Encyclopedia Astronautica – Delta
  3. ^ "The Martian (2015) - Trivia". imdb.com. Internet Movie Database. 

External links[edit]