GPR32

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GPR32
Identifiers
Aliases GPR32, RVDR1, G protein-coupled receptor 32
External IDs HomoloGene: 88647 GeneCards: 2854
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE GPR32 221469 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)

NM_001506

n/a

RefSeq (protein)

NP_001497.1

n/a

Location (UCSC) Chr 19: 50.77 – 50.77 Mb n/a
PubMed search [1] n/a
Wikidata
View/Edit Human

G protein-coupled receptor 32, also known as GPR32 or the RvD1 receptor, is a human gene belonging to the rhodopsin-like subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors.[1] GPR32 is most closely related to the chemotaxic formyl peptide receptors.[2]

At least 5 members of the D series of resolvins (RvDs) viz., RvD1, AT-RVD1, RvD3, AT-RvD3, and RvD5, activate their target cells through this receptor; these results have led to naming GPR32 the RVD1 receptor (see Resolvin#Mechanisms of Action).[3][4][5] RvDs are members of the specialized proresolving mediators (SPM) class of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites. RVDs are metabolites of the omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and, along with other SRMs contribute to the inhibition and resolution of a diverse range of inflammation and inflammation-related responses as well as to the healing of these inflammatory lesions in animals and humans.[6] The metabolism of DHA to RVD's and the activation of GPR32 by these RVD's are proposed to be one mechanism by which omega-3 fatty acids may ameliorate inflammation as well as various inflammation-based and other diseases.[7]


References[edit]

  1. ^ "Entrez Gene: GPR32 G protein-coupled receptor 32". 
  2. ^ Marchese A, Nguyen T, Malik P, Xu S, Cheng R, Xie Z, Heng HH, George SR, Kolakowski LF, O'Dowd BF (June 1998). "Cloning genes encoding receptors related to chemoattractant receptors". Genomics 50 (2): 281–6. doi:10.1006/geno.1998.5297. PMID 9653656. 
  3. ^ Krishnamoorthy S, Recchiuti A, Chiang N, Yacoubian S, Lee CH, Yang R, Petasis NA, Serhan CN (January 2010). "Resolvin D1 binds human phagocytes with evidence for proresolving receptors". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 107 (4): 1660–5. doi:10.1073/pnas.0907342107. PMC 2824371. PMID 20080636. 
  4. ^ Serhan CN, Chiang N, Dalli J, Levy BD (February 2015). "Lipid mediators in the resolution of inflammation". Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology 7 (2): a016311. doi:10.1101/cshperspect.a016311. PMID 25359497. 
  5. ^ Orr SK, Colas RA, Dalli J, Chiang N, Serhan CN (May 2015). "Proresolving actions of a new resolvin D1 analog mimetic qualifies as an immunoresolvent". American Journal of Physiology. Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology 308 (9): L904–11. doi:10.1152/ajplung.00370.2014. PMC 4421783. PMID 25770181. 
  6. ^ Headland SE, Norling LV (May 2015). "The resolution of inflammation: Principles and challenges". Seminars in Immunology 27 (3): 149–60. doi:10.1016/j.smim.2015.03.014. PMID 25911383. 
  7. ^ Calder PC (April 2015). "Marine omega-3 fatty acids and inflammatory processes: Effects, mechanisms and clinical relevance". Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1851 (4): 469–84. doi:10.1016/j.bbalip.2014.08.010. PMID 25149823. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Marchese A, Nguyen T, Malik P, Xu S, Cheng R, Xie Z, Heng HH, George SR, Kolakowski LF, O'Dowd BF (June 1998). "Cloning genes encoding receptors related to chemoattractant receptors". Genomics 50 (2): 281–6. doi:10.1006/geno.1998.5297. PMID 9653656.