GSAT-19

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GSAT-19
Mission type Communications
Operator INSAT
COSPAR ID 2017-031A
SATCAT no. 42747
Website GSAT-19
Mission duration Planned: 10 years[1]
Elapsed: 1 year, 4 months, 6 days
Spacecraft properties
Bus I-3K
Manufacturer ISRO Satellite Centre
Space Applications Centre
Launch mass 3,136 kg (6,914 lb)[1]
Dry mass 1,394 kg (3,073 lb)[1]
Dimensions 2.0 × 1.77 × 3.1 m (6.6 × 5.8 × 10.2 ft)[1]
Power 4,500 watts[1]
Start of mission
Launch date 5 June 2017, 11:58 (2017-06-05UTC11:58) UTC[2]
Rocket GSLV Mk III-D1[3]
Launch site Satish Dhawan SLP
Contractor ISRO
Orbital parameters
Reference system Geocentric
Regime Geostationary
Longitude 48° E[4]
Perigee 35,470 km (22,040 mi)
Apogee 35,869 km (22,288 mi)
Inclination 0.101 deg
Period 23 hr, 50 min, 10 sec
Epoch 10 June 2017, 02:29 UTC[5]
Transponders
Band
Coverage area India
← GSAT-9
GSAT-17 →

GSAT-19 is an Indian communications satellite launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation aboard a Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mark III on 5 June 2017.[2]

Satellite and payloads[edit]

The satellite will act as a testbed for the modular I-6K satellite bus, carrying experimental technologies such as ion thrusters for manoeuvring and stabilisation, active thermal control using thermal radiators, a miniaturised inertial reference unit, indigenously produced lithium-ion batteries, and C-band traveling-wave-tube amplifiers.[6][7][8]

Rather than traditional transponders, GSAT-19 carries four Ku/Ka-band forward link beams and four Ku/Ka-band return link beams, providing much higher data throughput than India's previous communications satellites.[9][10] It additionally carries a Geostationary Radiation Spectrometer (GRASP) payload, which will "monitor and study the nature of charged particles and the influence of space radiation on satellites and their electronic components".[11]

Orbit raising and station keeping[edit]

The satellite was launched aboard the GSLV Mk III-D1 rocket in the evening of 5 June 2017 to a geostationary transfer orbit perigee of 180 km (112 mi). This was followed by a series of orbit raising operations (using an on-board LAM and chemical thrusters[1]) to place the satellite in the intended geostationary orbital slot.

Op # Date/
Time (UTC)
LAM burn time Height achieved Inclination
achieved
Orbital period References
Apogee Perigee
1 6 June 2017
08:33
116 sec 35,938 km (22,331 mi) 172.77 km (107.35 mi) 21.56° 10 hr, 30 min [12]
2 7 June 2017
10:14
5538 sec 35,840 km (22,270 mi) 10,287 km (6,392 mi) 7.02° 13 hr, 58 min [13]
3 9 June 2017
04:25
3469 sec 35,875 km (22,292 mi) 30,208 km (18,770 mi) 0.793° 21 hr, 38 min [14]
4 10 June 2017
02:29
488 sec 35,869 km (22,288 mi) 35,470 km (22,040 mi) 0.101° 23 hr, 50 min, 10 sec [5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "GSLV Mark III-D1 / GSAT-19 Mission" (PDF). Indian Space Research Organisation.
  2. ^ a b Clark, Stephen (5 June 2017). "India's launcher fleet gets an upgrade with successful test flight". Spaceflight Now. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  3. ^ Laxmi Ajai, Prasannal (19 May 2017). "Come June 5, ISRO to launch 'game changer' rocket". The Times of India. Times News Network. Retrieved 21 May 2017.
  4. ^ "Delivered Communication and Navigation Payloads". ISRO/Space Applications Centre. Retrieved 6 June 2017.
  5. ^ a b "The fourth and final orbit raising operation..." Indian Space Research Organisation. 10 June 2017. Retrieved 12 June 2017.
  6. ^ "Annual Report: 2014-2015" (PDF). Indian Space Research Organisation. 2015. p. 26.
  7. ^ "First Prototype of ISRO's Semi-Cryogenic Engine To Be Ready By 2016". AA Me, IN. 19 August 2015. Retrieved 26 October 2016.
  8. ^ "GSat 19". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 27 May 2016.
  9. ^ "Isro's GSAT-19, GSAT-11 satellites: Game changers in communications". The Times of India. Press Trust of India. 5 June 2017. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  10. ^ Graham, William (5 June 2017). "GLSV Mark III rocket conducts 'all-up' launch with GSAT-19 satellite". NASASpaceFlight.com. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  11. ^ Ramachandran, R. (26 June 2017). "ISRO's Mk III Launched a Little-Known Instrument Called GRASP – This Is What It Does". The Wire. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  12. ^ "The first orbit raising operation..." Indian Space Research Organisation. 8 June 2017. Retrieved 12 June 2017.
  13. ^ "The second orbit raising operation..." Indian Space Research Organisation. 8 June 2017. Retrieved 12 June 2017.
  14. ^ "The third orbit raising operation..." Indian Space Research Organisation. 10 June 2017. Retrieved 12 June 2017.