GT 64: Championship Edition

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GT 64: Championship Edition
Gt64.jpg
North American cover art
Developer(s)Imagineer
Publisher(s)
Platform(s)Nintendo 64
Release
  • EU: April 14, 1998
  • NA: August 31, 1998
  • JP: October 30, 1998
Genre(s)Racing
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

GT 64: Championship Edition, known as City Tour GrandPrix: Zen Nihon GT Senshuken (CITY TOUR GRANDPRIX 〜全日本GT選手権〜) in Japan, is a racing video game developed by Imagineer and released for the Nintendo 64 console in 1998.

Gameplay[edit]

GT 64 is a racing game that features a ranking system comparable to Gran Turismo. Unlike the original version, which features tracks set in the US and Europe, the Japanese version features two new tracks set in Japan.[1] The game supports the Rumble Pak.[2]

Development[edit]

GT 64 was developed by Imagineer. It is an official licensed game to All-Japan GT Championship, featuring cars and drivers of the 1997 All Japan Grand Touring Car Championship.[3]

Reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate score
AggregatorScore
GameRankings47%[4]
Review scores
PublicationScore
Edge5/10[5]
EGM5.375/10[6]
Famitsu23/40[7]
GamePro3/5 stars[8]
GameSpot5/10[9]
Hyper63%[10]
IGN3.9/10[11]
N64 Magazine67%[12]
Next Generation1/5 stars[13]
Nintendo Power6.7/10[2]

Next Generation reviewed the Nintendo 64 version of the game, rating it one star out of five, and stated that "Overall GT 64 lacks both the technique of a technical racer and the speed of a fast racer – in fact, it lacks just about anything you can think of."[13]

GT 64 received generally unfavorable reviews from critics,[4] who criticized the game's limited number of tracks.[12][2] N64 Magazine noted that, while the game had been touted as having 12 tracks, it actually only has three, without considering the mirror variants and the fact that each track offers both a short and a long route. The magazine concluded that GT 64 is inferior to Gran Turismo or GTI Club, but still more enjoyable than Automobili Lamborghini.[12] Nintendo Power highlighted the game's energetic music and sound effects.[2] In Japan, Famitsu gave it a score of 23 out of 40.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ IGN staff (October 5, 1998). "N64 Games in October". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on March 8, 2016. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d "GT 64 Championship Edition". Nintendo Power. Vol. 111. Nintendo of America. August 1998. p. 96. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  3. ^ Edge staff (May 1998). "GT Racing (Preview)". Edge. No. 58. Future plc. p. 32.
  4. ^ a b "GT 64: Championship Edition". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on September 9, 2015. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  5. ^ Edge staff (June 1998). "GT 64 [Championship Edition]". Edge. No. 59. Future plc.
  6. ^ EGM staff (1998). "GT 64 Championship Edition". Electronic Gaming Monthly. Ziff Davis.
  7. ^ a b "CITY TOUR GRANDPRIX 〜全日本GT選手権〜 [NINTENDO64]". Famitsu (in Japanese). Enterbrain. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  8. ^ Bobba Fatt (1998). "GT 64: Championship Edition Review for N64 on GamePro.com". GamePro. IDG Entertainment. Archived from the original on February 15, 2005. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  9. ^ Josh Smith (September 15, 1998). "GT 64 Championship Edition Review". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on October 8, 2018. Retrieved October 10, 2018.
  10. ^ Simon Bailey (August 1998). "GT 64 Championship Edition". Hyper. No. 58. Next Media Pty Ltd. p. 54. Retrieved March 20, 2019.
  11. ^ Peer Schneider (September 11, 1998). "GT 64 Championship Edition". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on January 15, 2015. Retrieved October 8, 2018.
  12. ^ a b c Tim Weaver (July 1998). "GT64 [Championship Edition]". N64 Magazine. No. 17. Future plc. pp. 52–55.
  13. ^ a b "Finals". Next Generation. No. 47. Imagine Media. November 1998. p. 154.

External links[edit]