Gabe Aul

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Gabriel J. Aul
Gabriel Aul.jpg
Gabriel J. Aul in 2017
Born
Gabriel J. Aul

(1972-08-05) 5 August 1972 (age 47)
Aspen, Colorado
NationalityAmerican
OccupationCorporate Vice President of WDG, Engineering Systems team at Microsoft (2015-2019)
Vice President of Oculus at Facebook (2019-present)
EmployerMicrosoft (1992-2019)
Facebook (2019-present)
Spouse(s)Elizabeth "Liz" Aul (m)
Children3
Websitehttps://www.facebook.com

Gabriel J. "Gabe" Aul,[1] (born August 5, 1972) is the Vice President of Oculus[2] at Facebook. He was previously the Corporate Vice President (CVP) of Windows & Devices Group (WDG), Engineering Systems (1ES) team at Microsoft. He was appointed as VP on 31 July 2015, following the launch of Windows 10 on 29 July 2015. He led the Windows Insider Program until June 1, 2016, where he was succeeded by Dona Sarkar.[3]

Career[edit]

Aul started Microsoft's Security Response team for Internet Explorer in 1996. Aul was later part of a team that started Microsoft's Sustained Engineering group in Windows, responsible for delivering hotfixes and service packs to customers.

Aul led the effort to build Microsoft's first product telemetry systems. Before then, Microsoft had no idea about how many problems were occurring on customer systems, nor were they able to debug them. Aul led part of the team creating the technologies to allow upload of crash, hang, and other failure data (Windows Error Reporting) as well as Microsoft's anonymous data collection system for usage data (Customer Experience Improvement Program.) Aul won several engineering awards, patents, and published a paper[4] based on this work.

After Windows Vista, Aul started the Program Management team working on Performance for Windows, with Michael Fortin who led the Development team. Aul and his team spent 3 years working on Windows 7, the first edition of Windows ever that used less resources (memory, CPU, disk) than its predecessor.

Aul was promoted to Director and expanded his team to include reliability and security, and for Windows 8 they bested Windows 7 on those dimensions.

For Windows 10; Aul was running an even further expanded team (adding Data Science to his other “Fundamentals” role) and was able to lead the effort to enable Flighting and Feedback for Microsoft's "Windows as a Service" strategy. As part of that, Aul started the Windows Insider Program and got to be the face of the effort for a while.

Gabriel stepped down from his role of running the Windows Insider Program on 1 June 2016, citing that he couldn't "give 100%" to both the Insider Program and his other job on the Engineering Systems Team at once.[3]

On September 8, 2017, Gabriel Aul celebrated his 25th anniversary working at Microsoft.[5]

In 2019, Gabe Aul has left Microsoft for Facebook's[6] Oculus[7] team.

Patents[edit]

  1. Method and system for downloading updates for software installation - Filed: September 16, 1999 | Issued: December 10, 2002[8]
  2. Method and system for an incidental feedback platform - Filed: April 22, 2005 | Issued: June 24, 2008[9]
  3. Device emulation to facilitate data transfer - Filed: March 9, 2006 | Issued: January 10, 2012[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gabriel Aul (@GabeAul) - Twitter". twitter.com. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  2. ^ "D:\ona @ #InsiderDevTour on Twitter". twitter.com. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  3. ^ a b Aul, Gabe (1 June 2016). "A change in leadership for the Windows Insider Program - Windows Experience Blog". Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  4. ^ Communications of the ACM, "Debugging in the Very Large" https://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2011/7/109883-debugging-in-the-very-large/abstract
  5. ^ "Dona @ #InsiderDevTour on Twitter". twitter.com. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  6. ^ "Gabriel Aul on Twitter". twitter.com. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  7. ^ "D:\ona @ #InsiderDevTour on Twitter". twitter.com. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  8. ^ "United States Patent: 6493871". United States Patents Online. December 10, 2002.
  9. ^ "United States Patent: 7391312". United States Patents Online. June 24, 2008.
  10. ^ "United States Patent: 8095623". United States Patents Online. January 10, 2012.

External links[edit]