Gabriel Rosenstock

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Cover art: Portrait of the Artist as an Abominable Snowman

Gabriel Rosenstock (born 1949) is an Irish writer who works chiefly in the Irish language. A member of Aosdána, he is poet, playwright, haikuist, essayist, and author/translator of over 180 books, mostly in Irish. Born in Kilfinane, County Limerick, he currently resides in Dublin.

Biography[edit]

Rosenstock's father George was a doctor and writer from Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, who was in the Wehrmacht, and fought in World War II. His mother was a nurse from County Galway. Gabriel was the third of six children and the first born in Ireland. He was educated locally in Kilfinane, then in Mount Sackville, Co Dublin; exhibiting an early interest is anarchism he was expelled from Gormanston College, Co. Meath and exiled to Rockwell College, Co. Tipperary; then on to University College Cork.

His son Tristan Rosenstock is a member of the traditional Irish quintet Téada, and impressionist/actor Mario Rosenstock is his nephew.

Work[edit]

Rosenstock worked for some time on the television series Anois is Arís on RTÉ, then on the weekly newspaper Anois. Until his retirement he worked with An Gúm, the publications branch of Foras na Gaeilge, the North-South body which promotes the Irish language.

Although he has worked in prose, drama and translation, Rosenstock is primarily known as a poet. He has written or translated over 180 books.

He has edited and contributed to books of haiku in Irish, English, Scots and Japanese. He is a prolific translator into Irish of international poetry (among others Ko Un, Seamus Heaney, K. Satchidanandan, Rabindranath Tagore, Muhammad Iqbal, Hilde Domin, Peter Huchel), plays (Beckett, Frisch, Yeats) and songs (Bob Dylan, Kate Bush, The Pogues, Leonard Cohen, Bob Marley, Van Morrison, Joni Mitchell). He also has singable Irish translations of Lieder and other art songs.[1]

He appears in the anthology Best European Fiction 2012, edited by Aleksandar Hemon, with a preface by Nicole Krauss (Dalkey Archive Press).[2] He gave the keynote address to Haiku Canada in 2015.

His being named as Lineage Holder of Celtic Buddhism inspired the latest title in a rich output of haiku collections: Antlered Stag of Dawn (Onslaught Press, Oxford, 2015), haiku in Irish and English with translations into Japanese and Scots Lallans.

He also writes for children, in prose and verse. Haiku Más É Do Thoil É! (An Gúm) won the Children’s Books Judges’ Special Prize in 2015.

Awards and honours[edit]

List of selected works[edit]

Poetry in Irish
  • Susanne sa seomra folctha. Clódhanna 1973
  • Méaram. An Clóchomhar 1981
  • Om. An Clóchomhar 1983
  • Nihil Obstat. Coiscéim, 1984
  • Migmars. Ababúna, 1985
  • Rún na gCaisleán. Taibhse, 1986
  • Oráistí. Rogha dánta agus dánta nua. Cló Iar-Chonnachta, 1991
  • Ní mian léi an fhilíocht níos mó. Cló Iar-Chonnachta, 1993
  • Rogha Rosenstock. Cló Iar-Chonnachta, 1994
  • Syójó. Cló Iar-Chonnachta, 2001
  • Eachtraí Krishnamurphy. Coiscéim, 2003
  • Forgotten Whispers / Cogair dhearúdta. 2003. (Haiku with photography by John Minihan)
  • Krishnamurphy Ambaist. Coiscéim, 2004
  • Hymn to the Earth. The Silverstrand Press, 2004. (Poems and photography by Ron Rosenstock)
  • Rogha Dánta/ Selected Poems, translated by Paddy Bushe: CIC, 2005
  • Bliain an Bhandé/ Year of the Goddess. Dedalus Press 2007
  • Margadh na Míol in Valparaíso/ The Flea Market in Valparaíso (new and selected poems) CIC 2014
  • Cuach ó Aois Eile ag Glaoch. Coiscéim, 2014
  • Sasquatch. Arlen House, 2014
Criticism and essays in Irish
Poetry in English
  • Cold Moon: The Erotic Haiku of Gabriel Rosenstock, 1993
  • Portrait of the Artist as an Abominable Snowman. Selected Poems, translated from the Irish by Michael Hartnett, and New Poems, translated by Jason Sommer, Forest Books, 1989
  • Forgotten Whispers, 2003, with John Minihan. Haiku
  • Uttering Her Name (poems to the goddess Dar Óma) 2009 Salmon Poetry
  • The Invisible Light 2012 (Poems and photography by Ron Rosenstock)
  • Where Light Begins (haiku selection) Original Writing Ltd, Dublin, 2012
  • I Met a Man from Artikelly: Verse for the young and young at heart. Evertype, 2013, ISBN 978-1-78201-032-6
  • The Naked Octopus: Erotic haiku in English with Japanese translations. Evertype, 2013, ISBN 978-1-78201-048-7
  • Fluttering their way into my head: An exploration of Haiku for young people. Evertype, 2013, ISBN 978-1-78201-088-3
Translations
  • March hare, 1994. Short stories from the Irish language author Pádraic Breathnach
  • Whisper of Pines: Cogar na nGiúiseanna, Original Writing 2012. Irish language translations of English haiku from the Nepalese haiku poet Janak Sapkota
  • The Moon over Tagoto (contribution to a new multi-lingual version of that classic of world literature by haiku master Buson) Beehive Publishers, 2015
Books in English
  • The Wasp in the Mug: Unforgettable Irish Proverbs. Mercier Press, 1993
  • Lacertidae. (Novella) Coiscéim, 1994
  • Haiku Enlightenment (essay) Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2005
  • Haiku, the Gentle Art of Disappearing Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2005
  • The Pleasantries of Krishnamurphy Non-Duality Press, 2011
  • My Head is Missing 2012 (Detective novel)[3]
  • The Partisan and other stories. Evertype, 2014, ISBN 978-1-78201-057-9
DVD
  • The Light Within (poetry, photography and soundscape, with Ron Rosenstock and Eugene Skeef)[4]
Textbooks
  • Beginner's Irish, 2005

References[edit]

  1. ^ Irish-language singable versions of Lieder and art songs may be enjoyed at: http://www.lieder.net/lieder/index.html
  2. ^ Mackin, Laurence (21 April 2012). "A restless shuffle of postcards from Europe". The Irish Times (Irish Times Trust). Retrieved 21 April 2012. The reader can play guessing games and try to name the country or language of origin based purely on the prose, although the cliches rarely click into place. That said, the two Irish stories in this book, by Gabriel Rosenstock and Desmond Hogan, share a clipped, brusque pace and a certain measured brutality. 
  3. ^ Books Ireland, Summer 2012, says of the novel My Head is Missing: ‘This is a departure for Rosenstock but he is surefooted as he takes on the comic genre and writes a story full of engaging characters and a plot that keeps the reader turning the page.’
  4. ^ The Light Within teaser/trailer, retrieved 2015-12-27 

External links[edit]