Gabrielle Daleman

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Gabrielle Daleman
Gabrielle Daleman at 2017 Four Continents.jpg
Personal information
Country represented  Canada
Born (1998-01-13) January 13, 1998 (age 20)
Toronto, Ontario
Home town Newmarket, Ontario
Height 1.52 m (5 ft 0 in)
Coach Lee Barkell, Brian Orser, Tracy Wilson
Former coach Andrei Berezintsev, Inga Zusev, Kent Grice
Choreographer Lori Nichol
Former choreographer Andrei Berezintsev
Skating club Toronto Cricket, Skating and Curling Club
Former skating club Hilltop Skating Club of Newmarket
Training locations Toronto
Former training locations Richmond Hill, Ontario
Began skating 2002
World standing 10 (2017–18)
11 (2016–17)
16 (2015–16)
25 (2014–15)
41 (2013–14)
82 (2012–13)
ISU personal best scores
Combined total 214.15
2017 World Team Trophy
Short program 72.70
2016 Trophée de France
Free skate 142.41
2017 World Team Trophy

Gabrielle "Gabby" Daleman (born January 13, 1998) is a Canadian figure skater. She is a 2018 Olympic gold medalist in the team event, the 2017 World bronze medalist, 2017 Four Continents silver medalist, 2014 CS Autumn Classic champion, and three-time Canadian national champion. She represented Canada at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi and at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang.

Personal life[edit]

Gabrielle Daleman was born January 13, 1998 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada,[1] to Rhonda and Michael Daleman. She has a younger brother, Zack, who is also a competitive figure skater.[2] She lives in Newmarket, Ontario and attended Pickering College.[2][3] Her father has taught at the same school.[4]

Daleman has a learning disability affecting her ability to read and write.[5] She has also spoken about an eating disorder which she had from Grade 5 or 6 until after the 2014 Winter Olympics.[6][4]

Career[edit]

Early years[edit]

Daleman began skating at age four.[7] Her motivation grew after watching Joannie Rochette compete at the 2006 Winter Olympics.[7]

Daleman won the junior ladies' title at the 2012 Canadian Championships.

2012–2013 season[edit]

Daleman debuted on the ISU Junior Grand Prix series in autumn 2012. At the 2013 Canadian Championships, she won the silver medal behind Kaetlyn Osmond. She was sent to the 2013 World Junior Championships and finished sixth.

2013–2014 season[edit]

Daleman continued on the JGP series, winning the bronze medal at her event in Poland. In January 2014, after repeating as national silver medalist at the Canadian Championships, she was named in Canada's team to the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi in February. At 16 years of age, she was the youngest athlete on the Canadian Olympic team.[3] Daleman was not assigned to the team event, in which Canada won the silver medal, but she did compete in the individual event and finished in 17th place.[8]

Around February 2014, she developed a stress reaction (a precursor to a stress fracture) and plantar fasciitis in her right foot.[9][10]

2014–2015 season[edit]

Daleman began her season with a win at the 2014 Skate Canada Autumn Classic, an ISU Challenger Series event. Making her senior Grand Prix debut, she placed fifth at the 2014 Cup of China and sixth at the 2014 NHK Trophy. Competing with a strep throat at the 2015 Canadian Championships,[11] she placed first in the short program and second in the free skate. Daleman won the national title by a margin of 1.78 points over Alaine Chartrand. She finished seventh at the 2015 Four Continents Championships, 21st at the 2015 World Championships in Shanghai, and 8th at the 2015 World Team Trophy.

In the spring of 2015, Daleman parted ways with her longtime coaches – Andrei Berezintsev and Inga Zusev – and moved from Richmond Hill, Ontario to Toronto to train at the Toronto Cricket, Skating and Curling Club under Lee Barkell (as her main coach), Brian Orser, and Tracy Wilson.[12]

2015–2016 season[edit]

Daleman started the 2015–2016 season on the Challenger Series (CS), finishing 4th at the 2015 Ondrej Nepela Trophy.[13] Competing on the Grand Prix series, she placed 5th at the 2015 Skate Canada International and 6th at the 2015 Trophée Éric Bompard. She won the silver medal at the 2016 Canadian Championships in Halifax, Nova Scotia, finishing behind Alaine Chartrand and ahead of Kaetlyn Osmond. Soon after the event, she experienced severe swelling due to arthritis and tendinitis in her right foot.[10] On her treatment, she said, "I was probably in physio six, seven days a week for about three hours doing exercises, heating, icing, everything I could. I hate needles but I was doing acupuncture to get the swelling out."[10]

Daleman decided to withdraw from the 2016 Four Continents Championships as a precaution.[14] In March, she competed at the 2016 World Championships in Boston. She received personal best scores in the short, free, and total scores, landing her in the top ten for the first time. In the 2015–16 season, Daleman adjusted several aspects of her training and preparation – to practice elements with the same entry and exit as in her programs, improve the precision and timing of her in-between movements, and work more regularly with a mental performance consultant for athletes.[15]

2016–2017 season[edit]

Daleman (right) with Evgenia Medvedeva (center) and Kaetlyn Osmond (left) at the 2017 Worlds podium

Daleman took the bronze medal at the 2016 CS Nebelhorn Trophy, behind Mai Mihara and Elizaveta Tuktamysheva, before appearing in her third Grand Prix series. She finished fourth, 2.65 points off the podium, at the 2016 Skate America in Chicago, having ranked fourth in both segments. At her next GP event, the 2016 Trophée de France in Paris, she placed second in the short program, sixth in the free skate, and fourth overall.

In January 2017, Daleman won the silver medal at the 2017 Canadian Championships, finishing second to Kaetlyn Osmond with a deficit of 8.57 points. In February, she ranked first in the short and third in the free skate at the 2017 Four Continents Championships in Gangneung, South Korea. Finishing 3.94 points behind Japan's Mai Mihara, she won the silver medal, becoming the first Canadian ladies' single skater to land on the podium at Four Continents since 2009, when Joannie Rochette also obtained silver.

In March, Daleman won the bronze medal at the 2017 World Championships in Helsinki, Finland. The same month, she was found to have two abdominal cysts, one of which ruptured.[16] She was treated before Worlds but later had more problems and underwent surgery on May 20, 2017.[16][17][4]

2017–2018 season[edit]

In early November, Daleman finished 6th at the 2017 Cup of China after winning the short program and placing 7th in the free skate. She competed with a kidney infection in China and a viral infection at the 2017 Skate America later the same month.[5] She had the same final placement at the 2017 Skate America after placing 3rd in the short and 8th in the free.

Competing with pneumonia, Daleman placed first at the 2018 Canadian Championships in January.[18] She competed at the 2018 Winter Olympics, where she helped Canada win the gold medal in the team event. In the individual event, Daleman placed seventh in the short program. Daleman's free skate proved difficult, characterized by The Toronto Star as "a shambles" that featured "three falls, two over-rotations, a doubled-down triple" and "an agonizingly slow camel spin." She placed nineteenth in the free skate, dropping to fifteenth place overall.[19]

Daleman finished her season at the World Championships in Milan. She placed sixth in the short program, which she viewed as a redemptive skate following her trouble in Pyeongchang. However, she then injured her ankle on the morning of the free skate, where she struggled and placed eighth, leading to a seventh place finish in the event.[20]

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2017–2018
[1][21][22]




2016–2017
[27]


2015–2016
[29]
2014–2015
[9][30]
2013–2014
[31][32]
2012–2013
[33]

Competitive highlights[edit]

GP: Grand Prix; CS: Challenger Series; JGP: Junior Grand Prix

International[34]
Event 11–12 12–13 13–14 14–15 15–16 16–17 17–18 18–19
Olympics 17th 15th
Worlds 13th 21st 9th 3rd 7th
Four Continents 7th WD 2nd
GP Cup of China 5th 6th
GP NHK Trophy 6th TBD
GP Skate America 4th 6th
GP Skate Canada 5th TBD
GP Trophée 6th 4th
CS Autumn Classic 1st
CS Finlandia 6th
CS Nebelhorn 3rd
CS Nepela Trophy 4th
International: Junior[34]
Junior Worlds 6th
JGP Austria 6th
JGP Estonia 4th
JGP Germany 5th
JGP Poland 3rd
Challenge Cup 2nd J
National[35]
Canadian Champ. 1st J 2nd 2nd 1st 2nd 2nd 1st
SC Challenge 3rd J 3rd 1st
Team events
Olympics 1st T
3rd P
World Team
Trophy
2nd T
11th P
4th T
8th P
4th T
4th P
Team Challenge
Cup
1st T
8th P
J = Junior level; TBD = Assigned; WD = Withdrew
T = Team result; P = Personal result. Medals awarded for team result only.

Detailed results[edit]

Daleman (left) at the 2017 Four Continents podium

Small medals for short and free programs awarded only at ISU Championships. At team events, medals awarded for team results only.

2017–18 season
Date Event SP FS Total
March 21–23, 2018 2018 World Championships 6
71.61
8
125.11
7
196.72
February 14–23, 2018 2018 Winter Olympics (ladies' singles) 7
68.90
19
103.56
15
172.46
February 9–12, 2018 2018 Winter Olympics (team event) 3
137.14
1T
January 8–14, 2018 2018 Canadian Championships 1
77.88
1
151.90
1
229.78
November 24–26, 2017 2017 Skate America 3
68.08
8
121.06
6
189.14
November 3–5, 2017 2017 Cup of China 1
70.65
7
126.18
6
196.83
October 6–8, 2017 2017 CS Finlandia Trophy 5
60.72
7
114.11
6
174.83
2016–17 season
Date Event SP FS Total
April 20–23, 2017 2017 World Team Trophy 4
71.74
4
142.41
4T/4P
214.15
March 29 – April 2, 2017 2017 World Championships 3
72.19
3
141.33
3
213.52
February 15–19, 2017 2017 Four Continents Championships 1
68.25
3
128.66
2
196.91
January 16–22, 2017 2017 Canadian Championships 2
75.04
2
136.05
2
211.09
November 11–13, 2016 2016 Trophée de France 2
72.70
6
119.40
4
192.10
October 21–23, 2016 2016 Skate America 4
64.49
4
122.14
4
186.63
September 22–24, 2016 2016 CS Nebelhorn Trophy 3
60.15
3
115.25
3
175.40
2015–16 season
Date Event SP FS Total
April 22–24, 2016 2016 Team Challenge Cup 5
68.45
8
115.93
1T/8P
March 28 – April 3, 2016 2016 World Championships 8
67.38
9
128.30
9
195.68
January 18–24, 2016 2016 Canadian Championships 3
64.44
1
133.55
2
197.99
November 13–15, 2015 2015 Trophée Éric Bompard 6
55.35
6
October 30 – November 1, 2015 2015 Skate Canada International 8
54.13
3
116.20
5
170.33
October 1–3, 2015 2015 CS Ondrej Nepela Trophy 4
60.76
4
110.96
4
171.72
2014–15 season
Date Event SP FS Total
April 16–19, 2015 2015 World Team Trophy 8
57.59
8
98.87
4T/8P
156.46
March 23–29, 2015 2015 World Championships 21
48.13
20
85.44
21
133.57
February 9–15, 2015 2015 Four Continents Championships 8
55.25
6
111.84
7
167.09
January 19–25, 2015 2015 Canadian Championships 1
62.91
2
123.11
1
186.02
November 28–30, 2014 2014 NHK Trophy 7
53.46
6
111.28
6
164.74
November 7–9, 2014 2014 Cup of China 4
58.49
5
102.77
5
161.26
October 15–16, 2014 2014 CS Autumn Classic 1
59.38
2
106.21
1
165.59
2013–14 season
Date Event SP FS Total
March 24–30, 2014 2014 World Championships 14
55.72
11
109.06
13
164.78
February 6–22, 2014 2014 Winter Olympics 19
52.61
16
95.83
17
148.44
January 9–15, 2014 2014 Canadian Championships 3
58.38
2
124.09
2
182.47

Junior level[edit]

At team events, medals awarded for team results only.

2013–14 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
October 9–12, 2013 2013 JGP Estonia Junior 5
51.62
4
96.27
4
147.89
September 18–21, 2013 2013 JGP Poland Junior 5
46.77
3
101.52
3
148.29
2012–13 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
April 11–14, 2013 2013 World Team Trophy Senior 12
48.82
11
92.00
2T/11P
140.82
February 25 – March 3, 2013 2013 World Junior Championships Junior 8
50.70
6
98.69
6
149.39
January 13–20, 2013 2013 Canadian Championships Senior 5
51.80
2
112.10
2
163.90
October 10–13, 2012 2012 JGP Germany Junior 4
52.00
6
86.33
5
138.33
September 12–15, 2012 2012 JGP Austria Junior 7
48.55
5
91.22
6
139.77
2011–12 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
March 8–11, 2012 2012 International Challenge Cup Junior 3
47.06
2
85.42
2
132.48
January 16–22, 2012 2012 Canadian Junior Championships Junior 1
47.59
1
82.98
1
130.57
  • ISU Personal best highlighted in bold.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Gabrielle DALEMAN: 2017/2018". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on December 2, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Li, David (January 3, 2014). "Rogozine, Daleman lead local skaters to nationals". YorkRegion.com. Archived from the original on August 1, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "Gabrielle Daleman". Canadian Olympic Committee. Archived from the original on April 2, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c DiManno, Rosie (January 11, 2018). "Remarkable Daleman learns to soar, and forgive". Toronto Star. 
  5. ^ a b Smith, Beverley (January 11, 2018). "Gabby Daleman: what strength is". bevsmithwrites.wordpress.com. 
  6. ^ Ewing, Lori (January 11, 2018). "Gabrielle Daleman says health scares give her Olympic journey new meaning". The Canadian Press. CBC Sports. 
  7. ^ a b Muster, Judith (February 5, 2014). "Toronto Goes for Gold: Gabrielle Daleman". Post City Toronto. Archived from the original on February 10, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Gabrielle DALEMAN". sochi2014.com. Archived from the original on April 13, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b Slater, Paula (July 31, 2014). "Injury-free, Daleman eyes national title". Golden Skate. 
  10. ^ a b c Ewing, Lori (March 31, 2016). "Canadians Weaver and Poje miss out on medal at world championships". The Canadian Press. Winnipeg Free Press. Archived from the original on January 24, 2017. 
  11. ^ Slater, Paula (February 28, 2015). "Daleman confident as Worlds loom closer". Golden Skate. 
  12. ^ Hersh, Philip [@olyphil] (April 29, 2015). "Gabrielle Daleman- Coaching Change" (Tweet) – via Twitter. 
  13. ^ Slater, Paula (October 21, 2015). "'Total package' coming together for Canada's Daleman". Golden Skate. 
  14. ^ "Gabrielle Daleman, Julianne Séguin and Charlie Bilodeau withdraw from 2016 ISU Four Continents Figure Skating Championships". Skate Canada. February 11, 2016. Archived from the original on February 12, 2016. 
  15. ^ Luchianov, Vladislav (July 8, 2016). "Daleman finds renewed focus, passion in Toronto". IceNetwork.com. 
  16. ^ a b "Gabrielle Daleman has surgery to remove cyst". The Canadian Press. CBC Sports. May 23, 2017. 
  17. ^ Stinson, Scott (January 11, 2018). "Gabrielle Daleman's complicated road has given her a deep sense of self at age 19". The National Post. 
  18. ^ Smith, Beverley (January 12, 2018). "Gabby Daleman taking no prisoners". bevsmithwrites.wordpress.com. 
  19. ^ DiManno, Rosie (February 23, 2018). "Rochette consoles Daleman after agonizing Olympic free skate". The Toronto Star. 
  20. ^ Smith, Beverley (March 24, 2018). "Karen Magnussen passes the torch". bevsmithwrites.wordpress.com. 
  21. ^ Daleman, Gabrielle [@gabby_daleman] (July 3, 2017). "Long announcement will be coming tonight!" (Tweet) – via Twitter.  Daleman, Gabrielle [@gabby_daleman] (July 5, 2017). "Gladiator Rhapsody" (Tweet) – via Twitter. 
  22. ^ Daleman, Gabrielle (July 24, 2017). "I am... Carmen #ShortProgram #Sass #Flirty". 
  23. ^ Artificial Intelligence LG ThinQ Ice Fantasia 2018 (Television production). KBS. April 21, 2018. 
  24. ^ Daleman, Gabrielle (April 21, 2018). "I have nothing if I don't have you ✨" (Instagram). 
  25. ^ a b "Stars on Ice - Music: 2018 Investors Group Stars on Ice presented by Lindt". Stars on Ice. Archived from the original on May 2, 2018. Retrieved May 2, 2018. 
  26. ^ Championnats nationaux de patinage Canadian Tire 2018 (Television production). RDS. January 20, 2018. 
  27. ^ "Gabrielle DALEMAN: 2016/2017". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 21, 2017. 
  28. ^ a b "Stars on Ice - Music: 2017 Investors Group Stars on Ice presented by Lindt". Stars on Ice. Archived from the original on May 23, 2017. Retrieved May 23, 2017. 
  29. ^ "Gabrielle DALEMAN: 2015/2016". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 28, 2016. 
  30. ^ "Gabrielle DALEMAN: 2014/2015". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 21, 2015. 
  31. ^ "Gabrielle DALEMAN: 2013/2014". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 22, 2014. 
  32. ^ "Gabrielle Daleman: 2013/2014". Skate Canada. Archived from the original on February 13, 2014. 
  33. ^ "Gabrielle DALEMAN: 2012/2013". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on March 3, 2013. 
  34. ^ a b "Competition Results: Gabrielle DALEMAN". International Skating Union. 
  35. ^ "Gabrielle Daleman". Skate Canada. Retrieved September 15, 2014. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Gabrielle Daleman at Wikimedia Commons