Gail Gago

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The Honourable
Gail Gago
MLC
Member of the South Australian Legislative Council
Assumed office
9 February 2002
Personal details
Born 1957 (age 58–59)
Mooroopna, Victoria, Australia
Political party Australian Labor Party (SA)
Spouse(s) Peter Gago
Alma mater Monash University
Occupation Nurse, union official

Gail Elizabeth Gago (born 1957) is an Australian politician, and a member of the South Australian Branch of the Australian Labor Party in the South Australian Legislative Council since the 2002 election.

Background[edit]

Gago was born in Mooroopna, Victoria, and completed her secondary education at Shepparton High School. After high school, Gago studied at Phillip Institute of Technology and the Austin Hospital where she graduated as a registered nurse, later completing a Bachelor of Science (Honours) at Monash University, majoring in psychology.

In 1987, Gago and her husband Peter moved to South Australia, where she worked as a nurse at Salisbury Private Hospital for two years. In 1988 Gago started working with the Australian Nursing Federation (ANF) for 12 years, first as an organiser, later becoming assistant secretary and branch secretary.[1] As a member of the ANF, Gago was part of many campaigns to improve patient care, access to health services, wages and conditions for workers. She has participated in and contributed to a range of state and federal health and industrial relations forums.[2]

Gago has held membership of the South Australian Branch of the Australian Labor Party since 1991, contributing to policy committees and serving as state convention delegate (proxy), state executive member and national conference attendee. Gago is from the Labor Left faction.[3]

Parliament[edit]

Gago was elected to the Legislative Council from first position on the Labor ticket at the 2002 election and from second position on the Labor ticket at the 2010 election. After the resignation from Cabinet of Bernard Finnigan, Gago became acting Leader of the Government in the Legislative Council. She was also the only Minister in the Upper House.[4] On 17 May 2011, the Labor Caucus elected Gago the state's first woman leader of the Legislative Council.[5] Gago was also the state's first female Acting Premier of South Australia.[3]

Minister[edit]

Following the second term election of the Labor government in March 2006, Gago was appointed Minister for Environment and Conservation, Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse and Minister Assisting the Minister for Health. On 24 July 2008, Gago was appointed Minister for State/Local Government Relations, Minister for the Status of Women, Minister for Consumer Affairs, Minister for Government Enterprises and Minister Assisting the Minister for Transport, Infrastructure and Energy. On 8 February 2011, Gago was appointed Minister for Regional Development, Minister for Public Sector Management, Minister for the Status of Women, Minister for Consumer Affairs and Minister for Government Enterprises. On 21 April 2011, Gago was appointed Minister for Gambling. On 21 October 2011, Gago was appointed Minister for Agriculture Food and Fisheries, Minister for Forests, Minister for Regional Development, Minister for Tourism and Minister for the Status of Women. On 21 January 2013, Gago was appointed Minister for Minister for Agriculture, Food and Fisheries, Minister for Forests, Minister for Regional Development, Minister for the Status of Women and Minister for State/Local Government Relations.[2] Following the 2014 election, Gago was appointed Minister for Employment, Higher Education and Skills, Minister for Science and Information Economy, Minister for the Status of Women, and Minister for Business Services and Consumers in the Weatherill Labor cabinet.

Gago announced her resignation from cabinet on 15 January 2016, citing cabinet renewal.[6] Gago also announced she will not contest the 2018 election.[7]

Personal life[edit]

Gago is married to Penfolds chief winemaker Peter Gago.[3] She is also the sister of former Victorian state Labor member Kaye Darveniza.[8]

An advocate for healthy living, Gago's interests include bushwalking and running.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mayne, Stephen (25 January 2006). "Tracking the unionists in parliament". Crikey. Retrieved 28 April 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c Gail Gago MLC Government of South Australia, South Australia. Accessed 2014-03-23.
  3. ^ a b c Crouch, Brad "Peter and Gail Gago - South Australia's power couple" The Advertiser, South Australia (2013-06-21). Retrieved 2014-03-23.
  4. ^ Gago to go solo as upper house minister: AAP 27 April 2011
  5. ^ Gail Gago creates political history: The Advertiser 18 May 2011
  6. ^ Right to claim both vacancies: InDaily 15 December 2016
  7. ^ Gail Gago resigns as South Australian employment minister: ABC 15 December 2016
  8. ^ Parliament of Victoria Hansard [1] 11 November 1999, p137.

External links[edit]

Parliament of South Australia
Preceded by
Trevor Crothers
Legh Davis
Trevor Griffin
Jamie Irwin
Carolyn Pickles
Member of the South Australian Legislative Council
2002–present
Served alongside: Multiple Members
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Jennifer Rankine
Minister for the Status of Women
2008–2016
Succeeded by
Zoe Bettison
Minister for State / Local Government Relations
2008–2011
Succeeded by
Bernard Finnigan
Preceded by
Bernard Finnigan
Minister for Gambling
2008–2011
Succeeded by
Ian Hunter
as Minister for Social Inclusion
Preceded by
Jane Lomax-Smith
Minister for City of Adelaide
2010–2011
Succeeded by
John Rau
as Minister for Urban Development, Planning and the City of Adelaide
Preceded by
Mike Rann
as Premier of South Australia
Minister for Public Sector Management
2011
Succeeded by
Michael O'Brien
as Minister for the Public Sector
Preceded by
John Rau
Minister for Tourism
2011–2013
Succeeded by
Leon Bignell
Preceded by
Michael O'Brien
Minister for Agriculture, Food and Fisheries
2011–2014
Minister for Forests
2011 – 2014
Minister for Regional Development
2011–2014
Succeeded by
Geoff Brock
Preceded by
Bernard Finnigan
Leader of the Government in the Legislative Council
2011–2016
Succeeded by
Kyam Maher
Preceded by
Russell Wortley
Minister for State / Local Government Relations
2013–2014
Succeeded by
Geoff Brock
as Minister for Local Government
Preceded by
Grace Portolesi
Minister for Employment, Higher Education and Skills
2014–2016
Succeeded by
Kyam Maher
as Minister for Employment
Succeeded by
Susan Close
as Minister for Higher Education and Skills
Minister for Science and Information Economy
2014–2016
Succeeded by
Kyam Maher
Preceded by
John Rau
Minister for Business Services and Consumers
2014–2016
Succeeded by
John Rau
as Minister for Consumer and Business Services