Gajary

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Gajary
Municipality
Main street with the church
Main street with the church
Gajary is located in Bratislava Region
Gajary
Gajary
Location of Gajary in the Bratislava Region
Gajary is located in Slovakia
Gajary
Gajary
Gajary (Slovakia)
Coordinates: 48°27′58″N 16°55′26″E / 48.46611°N 16.92389°E / 48.46611; 16.92389Coordinates: 48°27′58″N 16°55′26″E / 48.46611°N 16.92389°E / 48.46611; 16.92389
CountrySlovakia
RegionBratislava
DistrictMalacky
First mentioned1337
Population
 • Total3,500
Postal code
900 61
Area code(s)421-34
Car plateMA
Websitewww.gajary.sk

Gajary (German: Gayring) is a village and municipality in western Slovakia close to the town of Malacky in the Bratislava region. It lies around 40 km (25 statute miles) north-west of Slovakia's capital Bratislava close to the Austrian border. The village has around 3500 inhabitants.

The village is an important archaeological site: findings from the Neolithic period, Eneolithic period, Bronze Age, early Slavic period (several Slavic settlements) have been excavated there. Ing. Ján Kubíček (1922–2003) former head of Finance at Slovakia's Ministry of Internal Affairs was born there.

Names and etymology[edit]

The Slovak name Gajary (1460 Gayary) comes from German personal name Geier (1337 Gaywar, later German name was Gairing). In the 14th century, the village had also the Hungarian name Öregház (Old House, 1377 Eureghaz), but the name was forgotten and then they used the name of German origin Gajár.[1]

Genealogical resources[edit]

The records for genealogical research are available at the state archive "Statny Archiv in Bratislava, Slovakia"

  • Roman Catholic church records (births/marriages/deaths): 1657-1895 (parish A)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Varsik, Branislav (1984). Z osídlenia západného a stredného Slovenska v stredoveku (in Slovak). Bratislava: Veda, vydavateľstvo Slovenskej akadémie vied. p. 102.

External links[edit]

Media related to Gajary at Wikimedia Commons