Galtymore

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Galtymore
Cnoc Mór na nGaibhlte
Galtymore Mountains.JPG
Highest point
Elevation 919 m (3,015 ft) [1][2]
Prominence 899 m (2,949 ft) [1]
Listing Hewitt, Marilyn
Coordinates 52°21′58″N 8°10′45″W / 52.366037°N 8.179118°W / 52.366037; -8.179118
Naming
Translation big hill of the Galtees (Irish)
Pronunciation Irish: [ˈɡɑlʲtʲə ˈmoːɾ]
Geography
Galtymore is located in island of Ireland
Galtymore
Galtymore
Location in Ireland
Location County Limerick/Tipperary,
Republic of Ireland
Parent range Galty Mountains
OSI/OSNI grid R878238
Topo map OSi Discovery 74

Galtymore or Galteemore (Irish: Cnoc Mór na nGaibhlte, meaning "big hill of the Galtys")[3] is a 919 m (3015 ft) mountain on the border between counties Limerick and Tipperary, Republic of Ireland. It is the highest of the Galty Mountains and the 14th highest peak in Ireland.[1] Galtymore is notable in that it is the tallest inland mountain in Ireland, and the only inland peak to exceed 915 m (3000 ft). The townland that covers the southern face of Galtymore is called Knocknagalty (Cnoc na nGaibhlte).[4][5] Galtymore is informally referred to as one of the Irish Munros and is classed as a Furth by the Scottish Mountaineering Club, i.e. a 3,000 footer outside Scotland.[6]

Geography[edit]

Galtymore Summit - Trig Point

Galtymore sits near the middle of the east–west Galty mountain ridge. To the east of Galtymore is Galtybeg (799 m) and to the west is Slievecushnabinnia (766 m).[4]

The slopes of Galtymore are steep but the summit is broad, rounded and rocky. This is due to the constant freeze-thaw action experienced by the summit during the last ice age. The north face shows much evidence of glacial erosion. It harboured a number of corrie glaciers, most of which are now occupied by loughs. Lough Diheen lies between Galtymore and Galtybeg, while Lough Curra lies between Galtymore and Slievecushnabinnia.[4]

Climbing Galtymore[edit]

Galtymore is not a difficult mountain to climb (no special equipment is needed), but the Galtees are steeper than many Irish mountains and the north face is often snow-covered in the winter months. A popular starting point for the ascent of Galtymore is the "Black Road" which can be accessed from the R639 road near the village of Skeheenarinky.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Coordinates: 52°21′58″N 8°10′44″W / 52.366°N 8.179°W / 52.366; -8.179