Gandiva

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Arjuna abandoning Gandiva after the Kurukshetra war.

Gandiva (IAST: Gāṇḍīva; Sanskrit: गाण्डीव) is the bow of Arjuna, one of the pandavas from Hindu epic Mahabharata and was made by Brahma.[1][2]

Mythology[edit]

Agni, the God of fire, wanted to devour the Khandava forest, to regain his power and splendour. He had enlisted the help of the two heroes, Krishna and Arjuna. The latter was one of the greatest archers of all time, and demanded Agni for a bow which would suit his strength, skill and the power of celestial weapons.

Agni provided the heroes with the desired weapons. He gave the Gandiva bow to Arjuna, as well as two quivers which would provide an inexhaustible number of arrows.[3][4]

The weapon was dreaded by many during the Kurukshetra war, having defeated and killed many great warriors and the gods themselves.

Features[edit]

The Gandiva represents the wielder's self confidence, self belief in themselves that comes from their hard work and toil[5]. The bow was well adorned and endued with great energy and is said to equivalent to a hundred thousand bows, it was also incapable of being damaged and was worshiped by the celestials and the Gandharvas.[6]

Return to the gods[edit]

At the end of the dwapar yuga, Krishna departed the mortal world and left for Vaikuntha. Arjuna could not string the bow, or remember the spells necessary in order to summon his celestial weapons. Later the pandavas retired and journeyed to the himalayas. On their route, Agni came and asked Arjuna to return the Gandiva to varuna. Arjuna obliged and dropped them in the waters of the sea. Thus the celestial bow was returned to the gods.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vyasa's Mahabharatam. Academic Publishers. 2008. ISBN 9788189781682.
  2. ^ The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa: Adi parva. Sabha parva. Bharata Press. 1883. p. 624.
  3. ^ The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa: Adi parva. Sabha parva. Bharata Press. 1883. p. 623.
  4. ^ Vyasa's Mahabharatam. Academic Publishers. 2008. ISBN 9788189781682.
  5. ^ Srivastava, Diwaker Ikshit (2017). Decoding the Metaphor Mahabharata. Leadstart Publishing PvtLtd. ISBN 9789352010004.
  6. ^ The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa: Adi parva. Sabha parva. Bharata Press. 1883. p. 624.
  7. ^ Vyasa's Mahabharatam. Academic Publishers. 2008. ISBN 9788189781682.

External links[edit]