Gapers Block

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Gapers Block
Privately held company
Founded2003 (2003)
FounderAndrew Huff
Naz Hamid
Headquarters,
Key people
Andrew Huff
ServicesOnline magazine
Websitegapersblock.com

Gapers Block (Gapers Block Media, LLC) was a Chicago-centric web publication focused on covering Chicago culture under the tag line: "Slow down and check out Chicago". The site, gapersblock.com, lists local events, aggregates other Chicago blogs and news of local interest and features many topical blogs: A/C (arts and culture), Drive-Thru (food related), Transmission (local music), Mechanics (state and local politics), Tailgate (sports coverage), and Book Club (book club and literary scene coverage).

History[edit]

Conceived in 2003 by Andrew Huff and Naz Hamid, the stuck-in-traffic themed section names, such as Merge (blog, links aggregation), Slowdown (calendar event listings), and Rearview (noteworthy local photos), are inspired by the Chicago-coined term, "gapers' block", a synonym (with "gapers' delay") for rubbernecking. The site was the first city blog in Chicago and one of the earliest examples of the genre; Gothamist and the Metroblogging network were also founded in 2003.

The site is written by volunteers from various backgrounds and professions, with content organized into topical sections, including arts & culture, literature, food, music, politics, and sports.[1]

In 2010, the cookbook The Everything Cast Iron Cookbook was published, based in large part on author Cinnamon Cooper's "One Good Meal" column[2] on Gapers Block.[3]

In December 2015, editor and publisher Andrew Huff announced the site would be going on "indefinite hiatus" on January 1, 2016.[4]

Accreditations and awards[edit]

  • It was named a "Forbes Favorite"[5] in Forbes.com's Best of the Web directory, in the category "Best City Blogs."
  • Web design site Typesites credits Gapers Block’s aesthetics, “well-crafted layout”[6] and noteworthy typography.
  • Chicago Community Trust awarded Gapers Block $35,000 in an effort to boost new sources of local news and information and “increase the amount of neighborhood-based, original local coverage ... with priority given to stories about underserved communities and issues that affect them.”[7]
  • The Chicago Sun-Times in 2009 named the Gapers Block Book Club the #2 best way to find romance in Chicago.[8]
  • Gapers Block Editor and publisher Andrew Huff was listed in Crain’s Chicago Business’s “40 Under 40”[9] in 2009.
  • David Schalliol, Brian Ashby, Dave Nagel, Akemi Honga and Natalia Echeverry were the recipients of the Peter Lisagor Award for Best Use of Features Video[10] for "The Area" in 2014. Jason Prechtel was a finalist[11] for the award for Best Individual Blog Post, Independent for “Ventra’s Parent Company: An International History of Fare Card Glitches" the same year.
  • The site was named Best Local Blog in the Chicago Reader's "Best of Chicago" poll in 2013,[12] 2014[13] and 2015[14]

Notable contributors and alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gapers Block - Chicago news, reviews & commentary
  2. ^ "One Good Meal archives". Gapersblock.com. Retrieved 10 December 2012.
  3. ^ Cooper, Cinnamon (2010). The Everything Cast Iron Cookbook. United States: Adams Media. p. 304. ISBN 1440502250.
  4. ^ "A Letter from the Editor". Gapersblock.com. Retrieved 21 December 2015.
  5. ^ "Gapers Block", Forbes, Web Site Reviews, accessed May 31, 2010.
  6. ^ gapers block | Typesites
  7. ^ The Chicago Community Trust Announces Community News Matters Award Recipients - Knight Foundation
  8. ^ http://www.suntimes.com/-1,romance-places-092509g.photogallery?index=2[dead link]
  9. ^ 40 Under 40: 2009 | Crain's Chicago Business
  10. ^ [1]
  11. ^ [2]
  12. ^ Chicago Reader - Best of Chicago 2013 - Best Local Blog Accessed Sept. 5, 2013.
  13. ^ Chicago Reader - Best of Chicago 2014 - Best Local Blog Accessed June 25, 2014.
  14. ^ Chicago Reader - Best of Chicago 2015 - Best Local Blog Accessed June 24, 2015.

External links[edit]