Garcinia dulcis

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Garcinia dulcis
COLLECTIE TROPENMUSEUM Blad en vrucht van de Xanthochymus dulcis roxb moendoe TMnr 3401-1683.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Malpighiales
Family: Clusiaceae
Genus: Garcinia
Species:
G. dulcis
Binomial name
Garcinia dulcis
(Roxb.) Kurz

Garcinia dulcis is a tropical fruit tree native to the Philippines, eastern Indonesia (Sulawesi, Kalimantan, and the Maluku Islands), and Papua New Guinea. It was domesticated early and spread inland into mainland Asia.[1][2][3] It is commonly known as mundu or munu in Indonesia and Malaysia,[1] baniti or taklang-anak in the Philippines,[4][5][6] and maphuut or ma phut in Thailand.[5][7]

The tree is harvested from the wild as a local source of food, medicine or dyeing material and is sometimes cultivated for its fruit, which is occasionally sold locally. Garcinia dulcis is not grown commercially.

Description[edit]

Garcinia dulcis is an evergreen tree with horizontal branches and a dense, pyramidal crown. It can grow up to 15 metres tall and has a short, straight trunk, which can develop to a size of 30 cm in diameter. The tree grows best in areas where annual daytime temperatures are within the range of 22–30 °C and is well adapted to shade and humid conditions. Flowering usually occurs twice a year after long periods of drought.[7]

Uses[edit]

The orange coloured fruits can be eaten fresh; they contain a sour, juicy pulp, which can be preserved into jam. Green dye can be obtained from the bark, when mixed with indigo it gives a brown colour which is used to dye mats. From the unripe fruits a yellow dye, called gamboge, can be extracted, but is considered inferior to other dyes from members of the same genus like Garcinia xanthochymus. Garcinia dulcis also has medicanal purposes; it can be used for the treatment of wounds or scurvy.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Blench, Roger (2008). "A History of Fruits in the Southeast Asian Mainland". In Osada, Toshiki; Uesugi, Akinori (eds.). Occasional Paper 4: Linguistics, Archaeology and the Human Past. Indus Project, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature. pp. 115–137.
  2. ^ "Garcinia dulcis (Roxb.) Kurz", Plants of the World Online, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, retrieved 2019-01-27 CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "Garcinia dulcis specimens". Tropicos.org. Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 2015-02-06. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ Schneider, Edwin Emil (1916). Commercial Woods of the Philippines: Their Preparation and Uses. Bureau of Printing. pp. 160–161.
  5. ^ a b "Garcinia dulcis (PROSEA)". Pl@ntUse. Retrieved 28 March 2021.
  6. ^ "Garcinia dulcis (Roxb.) Kurz". Globinmed. Retrieved 28 March 2021.
  7. ^ a b c "Garcinia dulcis". Useful Tropical Plants Database. Retrieved 2016-05-14. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)