Garry Lyon

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Garry Lyon
Garry lyon.jpg
Lyon in 2008
Personal information
Full name Garry Peter Lyon
Date of birth (1967-09-13) 13 September 1967 (age 50)
Place of birth Devonport, Tasmania
Original team(s) Kyabram
Height 193 cm (6 ft 4 in)
Weight 96 kg (212 lb)
Position(s) Centre half-forward
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1986–1999 Melbourne 226 (426)
Representative team honours
Years Team Games (Goals)
1989–1995 Victoria 10 00(?)
Coaching career
Years Club Games (W–L–D)
2001–2004 Australia 8 (2–5–1)
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1999.
Career highlights
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com

Garry Peter Lyon (born 13 September 1967) is a former professional Australian rules football player and was captain of the Melbourne Football Club in the Australian Football League (AFL). Since his retirement from football, he has been mainly an Australian rules football media personality, featuring on television, radio and in newspapers. He has also coached during the International Rules Series.

Early life[edit]

Lyon, the son of former Hawthorn player Peter Lyon, was born in Devonport, Tasmania. In his youth he moved to Victoria, where he attended Melbourne High School.

Career[edit]

VFL/AFL[edit]

Lyon was recruited from the Kyabram Football Club and debuted in 1986 with the Melbourne Football Club, playing in the 1988 VFL Grand Final. He quickly became a dominant player in the Victorian Football League (VFL), later renamed the Australian Football League (AFL), winning his first Melbourne best and fairest award in 1990. He became Melbourne's captain in 1991 and eventually became the longest-serving Melbourne captain in club history until he was released from the role after the 1997 season due to the club's belief that he would suffer from too many injuries. Lyon was known for playing with many back injuries and his presence on the field despite such adversity saw him as an inspiration to teammates.[1]

Lyon finished his career having won two Melbourne best and fairest awards and being named in three All-Australian teams. His career ended as a result of increasing back problems. A broken leg, footage of which is often played on The AFL Footy Show, ended his 1987 season. In the end he finished with 226 VFL/AFL games and 426 goals in 1999, third best all-time for a Melbourne player.

State of Origin[edit]

Lyon had a successful State of Origin career for Victoria, first being selected in 1988 against Western Australia. In 1989 he played in a famous game against South Australia, where Tony Lockett, Jason Dunstall and Dermott Brereton all played in the same forward line, performing well being named in the best players.[2] In 1991 Lyon scored one goal against South Australia. He was selected again in 1992 against the same opposition. In 1993 he performed on the big stage in the State of Origin Carnival grand final against South Australia, kicking three goals and being named in the best players.[3] In 1994 he was named Captain of Victoria, in what he has described as "a great honour".[4] In 1995 he was named vice-captain against South Australia, scoring one goal.[5] Lyon is a big supporter of Victoria and State of Origin and has said in reference to playing State of Origin that he "loved it".[6] He is also a big supporter of State of Origin being reintroduced,[7] and has described training and playing with the best players in the game as a "dream come true" and "it took the experience of playing football to another level".[8] He has said that the great players of today should be afforded the same honour.[9]

Media career[edit]

Lyon's radio career began in the late 1990s on 3AW, and in 2004 he hosted Morning Glory on SEN 1116. In 2005 he returned to 3AW, and appeared on Sports Today as well as providing special comments for the station's AFL coverage. In 2007, Lyon moved to Triple M where he provided special comments on Friday Night and Saturday afternoon matches until the end of 2015. Lyon became a regular panelist on The AFL Footy Show late in his playing career. In 2006, alongside James Brayshaw, he took the hosting reins of the program after Eddie McGuire became CEO of the Nine Network. Previously he had worked alongside Brayshaw on The Sunday Footy Show and in 2005 on Any Given Sunday, as well as being a presenter of the Melbourne Commonwealth Games 2006 coverage on Nine. In 2007 he became a panelist on the program Footy Classified.

In late 2016 after a year off radio to deal with personal issues it was announced Lyon would return to SEN 1116 as host of their breakfast show and a Friday night commentator.[10]

Lyon is a columnist for The Age newspaper and has co-authored children's books, including those in the Specky Magee series with Felice Arena.

Coaching[edit]

Since his retirement, Lyon has dabbled in coaching. He has coached the Australian international rules football team debuting in 2001 and remained coach for four successive seasons before being replaced by Kevin Sheedy. His International rules record remains as two heavy losses and two narrow wins.

Despite being touted as a potential Melbourne Football Club coach, Lyon has vowed not to re-enter senior coaching. In 2009, he coached the Victorian under 16 representative side at the AFL championships.[11]

Playing statistics[edit]

Brownlow Medal votes
Season Votes
1986 3
1987 1
1988
1989 3
1990 9
1991
1992
1993 5
1994 10
1995 9
1996
1997
1998
1999
Total 40
Key:
Green / Bold = Won
[12]
Legend
 G  Goals  B  Behinds  K  Kicks  H  Handballs  D  Disposals  M  Marks  T  Tackles
Season Team # Games G B K H D M T G B K H D M T
Totals Averages (per game)
1986 Melbourne 3 20 26 18 215 65 280 70 N/A 1.3 0.9 10.8 3.3 14.0 3.5 N/A
1987 Melbourne 3 18 28 20 189 76 265 69 21 1.6 1.1 10.5 4.2 14.7 3.8 1.2
1988 Melbourne 3 22 41 30 278 82 360 110 43 1.9 1.4 12.6 3.7 16.4 5.0 2.0
1989 Melbourne 3 15 20 12 230 57 287 89 18 1.3 0.8 15.3 3.8 19.1 5.9 1.2
1990 Melbourne 3 21 13 9 284 89 373 104 47 0.6 0.4 13.5 4.2 17.8 5.0 2.2
1991 Melbourne 3 18 11 11 235 125 360 79 39 0.6 0.6 13.1 6.9 20.0 4.4 2.2
1992 Melbourne 3 16 30 14 211 101 312 84 34 1.9 0.9 13.2 6.3 19.5 5.3 2.1
1993 Melbourne 3 18 36 37 242 100 342 120 17 2.0 2.1 13.4 5.6 19.0 6.7 0.9
1994 Melbourne 3 24 79 47 295 80 375 151 36 3.3 2.0 12.3 3.3 15.6 6.3 1.5
1995 Melbourne 3 20 77 46 233 44 277 109 25 3.9 2.3 11.7 2.2 13.9 5.5 1.3
1996 Melbourne 3 6 15 8 50 11 61 25 5 2.5 1.3 8.3 1.8 10.2 4.2 0.8
1997 Melbourne 3 5 7 8 27 6 33 13 3 1.4 1.6 5.4 1.2 6.6 2.6 0.6
1998 Melbourne 3 21 40 17 154 56 210 71 26 1.9 0.8 7.3 2.7 10.0 3.4 1.2
1999 Melbourne 3 2 3 0 13 6 19 9 1 1.5 0.0 6.5 3.0 9.5 4.5 0.5
Career 226 426 277 2656 898 3554 1103 315 1.9 1.2 11.8 4.0 15.7 4.9 1.5

References[edit]

  1. ^ Holmesby, R. and Main, J. (2005). The Encyclopedia of AFL Footballers. ISBN 1-86350-243-2
  2. ^ "Digitised Resource Viewer". cedric.slv.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2016-03-05. 
  3. ^ "Digitised Resource Viewer". cedric.slv.vic.gov.au. Retrieved 2016-03-05. 
  4. ^ The YouTube Rub (2014-05-31), 31/05/2014 The Origin of the Fraudulent Chief, retrieved 2016-03-05 
  5. ^ SAfootballarchive (2012-03-06), 1995 State of Origin Victoria 18.12.120 d South Australia 8.9.57 (Ted Whitten Farewell game), retrieved 2016-03-05 
  6. ^ The YouTube Rub (2012-05-11), 11/05/2012 State of Origin: Yes or No?, retrieved 2016-03-05 
  7. ^ Lyon, Garry (2011-06-18). "No stopping the pick of the Vics". The Age. Retrieved 2016-03-05. 
  8. ^ Lyon, Garry (2011-06-18). "No stopping the pick of the Vics". The Age. Retrieved 2016-03-05. 
  9. ^ Lyon, Garry (2011-06-18). "No stopping the pick of the Vics". The Age. Retrieved 2016-03-05. 
  10. ^ Garry Lyon set to return to SEN radio following affair with best mate Billy Brownless ex-wife, Daily Mail, 22 November 2016
  11. ^ Wilson, Caroline (4 March 2010). "Lyon tells: Why I'll never coach". TheAge.com.au. Fairfax Media. Retrieved 23 May 2013. 
  12. ^ Garry Lyon's player profile at AFL Tables

External links[edit]