Gary Banz

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Gary Banz
Gary Banz.jpg
Oklahoma State Representative
In office
2004–2016
Preceded by Forrest Claunch
Succeeded by Tess Teague
Constituency 101st House District
Personal details
Born (1945-12-07) 7 December 1945 (age 71)
Sylvia, Kansas
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Linda[1]
Residence Midwest City, Oklahoma
Alma mater University of Central Oklahoma, Southern Nazarene College [1]
Occupation Retired Teacher, Politician[2]
Religion Church of the Nazarene [3]

Gary Banz (born December 7, 1945) is a retired American educator and former Republican politician from the U.S. state of Oklahoma. He served as a majority whip of the Oklahoma House of Representatives and as Oklahoma state leader besides national secretary of the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC).[4][5]

Banz was the author of a bill to reduce the number of state lawmakers.[6]

Early life[edit]

Banz was born December 7, 1945, in Sylvia, Kansas.[7] He joined the United States Army in June 1968 and served until January 1970. He was awarded the Army Commendation Medal on March 19, 1970. He also served in the United States Army Reserve from December 1982 until September 1990. He was awarded the Army Achievement Medal on May 7, 1985.[8]

Banz married Linda and had three children who graduated from Midwest City High School. Banz taught in various Oklahoma school districts before retiring and eventually running for office.[9]

Political career[edit]

Banz was first elected to House District 101 with no Democratic opposition in 2004.[10] However, he did face two primary opponents, Jeremy Sellers and Todd Dealy.[11] He faced no opposition in 2006[12] In 2008, he defeated Democratic challenger Donnie Lewis.[13] In 2012, he defeated Democratic challenger Stephen Covert.[14]

Banz proposed House Joint Resolution 1021, which seeks to reduce the size of the Oklahoma Legislature by cutting the number of lawmakers.[15] The legislation was not enacted during the 2012 legislative session, but would have put a state question on the November 2012 ballot. If approved by voters, it would have been implemented in 2021.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gary Banz Bio, VoteSmart.org Retrieved on May 8, 2009.
  2. ^ Gary Banz Bio, VoteSmart.org Retrieved on May 8, 2009.
  3. ^ Gary Banz Bio, VoteSmart.org Retrieved on May 8, 2009.
  4. ^ State Chairmen, ALEC.org. Retrieved August 6, 2012.
  5. ^ Wines, Michael (August 22, 2016). "Inside the Conservative Push for States to Amend the Constitution". NYT. Retrieved August 24, 2016. 
  6. ^ Oklahoma Capitol briefs, The Oklahoman. Published September 9, 2011.
  7. ^ Gary Banz Bio, VoteSmart.org Retrieved on May 8, 2009.
  8. ^ Gary Banz Web site. Retrieved on May 8, 2009.
  9. ^ Gary Banz Web site. Retrieved on May 8, 2009.
  10. ^ Unopposed Candidates Elected (2004) at Oklahoma State Election Board (accessed April 9, 2010)
  11. ^ Republican Primary Election (July 27, 2004) at Oklahoma State Election Board (accessed April 9, 2010)
  12. ^ Unopposed Candidates Elected (2006) at Oklahoma State Election Board (accessed April 9, 2010)
  13. ^ 2008 election results at Oklahoma State Election Board (accessed April 9, 2010)
  14. ^ 2012 General Election Results Oklahoma State Election Board (accessed April 16, 2013).
  15. ^ Hoberock, Barbara. Coming Monday: Lawmaker seeks to reduce size of state House, Senate, Tulsa World. Published November 25, 2011.