Gashadokuro

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Utagawa Kuniyoshi, "Souma no furudairi (相馬の古内裏)" also known as "Takiyasha the Witch and the Skeleton Spectre".

Gashadokuro (がしゃどくろ/ 餓者髑髏, literally "starving skeleton", also known as Odokuro) are mythical creatures in Japanese mythology.

Description[edit]

The Gashadokuro are spirits that take the form of giant skeletons and are fifteen times larger than an average person, said to be created from the amassed bones of people who died of starvation or in battle, without being buried. These yōkai roam after midnight, grabbing lone travelers and biting off their heads to drink their spraying blood. There is a way to know of their approach, as the victim would hear the sound of loud ringing in the ear. The Gashadokuro are said to possess the powers of invisibility and indestructibility, though Shinto charms are said to ward them off.[1][better source needed]

In the entry for Gashadokuro in Mizuki's book, a related tale from the Nihon Ryōiki is introduced. It tells of a man in Bingo Province (Hiroshima Prefecture) who is in a field at night and, hearing an eerie voice moaning, "My eye hurts," finds a skeleton there with a bamboo shoot growing from its eye socket. He removes the bamboo shoot and offers the skeleton dried boiled rice, upon which the skeleton tells him the story of its murder and its personal history, and rewards him for his kindness. Though this tale has been conflated with that of the Gashadokuro, the two are in fact unrelated, the Gashadokuro having originated in the later half of the 20th century.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jonathan Maberry (2006). Vampire Universe: The Dark World of Supernatural Beings That Haunt Us, Hunt Us, and Hunger for Us. ISBN 9780806528137.