Gasoline (band)

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Gasoline
OriginUnited States
GenresSouthern rock, heavy metal
Associated actsPantera, Pumpjack, Hellyeah

Gasoline was a southern rock[1] band and side project for former Pantera member Vinnie Paul. They once included Dimebag Darrell, Thurber T. Mingus, and Stroker of Pumpjack. Paul described the group's general theme as "booze and women."[2] The band has covered many artists including Pat Travers, Ted Nugent, Black Sabbath, W.A.S.P., Thin Lizzy, Quiet Riot, and Slayer,[3] but have also performed original songs like "This Ain’t a Beer Belly, It’s a Gas Tank For My Love Machine" and "Get Drunk Now."[4] Paul claims the band formed as followed:

Pantera played every New Year’s Eve until about ’97. After that, the other two guys decided they didn’t want to play on New Year’s Eve, and that was my favorite time to play. Me and Dime decided that we’d put together a good time band and just do cover tunes and it was all about beer drinkin' and hell raisin'.[4]

In 2006 Pantera's ex-bassist, Rex Brown, played with Vinnie Paul in Texas for the first time in several years with the band.[5]

References[edit]

  • Gulla, Bob (2009). Guitar Gods: The 25 Players Who Made Rock History. Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 978-0-313-35806-7.
  • Sharpe-Young, Garry (2005). New Wave of American Heavy Metal. Zonda Books Limited. ISBN 0-9582684-0-1.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Sharpe-Young 2005, pg. 233
  2. ^ Wiederhorn, Jon. "Pantera Members Rip It Up With Rebellious Side Projects". MTV. Retrieved 18 February 2010.
  3. ^ "PANTERA Side Project And Special Guests Get Fired Up On New Year's Eve!". Blabbermouth.net. Archived from the original on 6 June 2011. Retrieved 18 February 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  4. ^ a b "Vinnie and Rex Ring in the New Year Together". KNAC. Retrieved 18 February 2010.
  5. ^ "Ex-PANTERA Bandmates REX BROWN And VINNIE PAUL Play Together For First Time In Over Four Years". Blabbermouth.net. Archived from the original on 6 June 2011. Retrieved 18 February 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)