Geber (crater)

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Geber
Geber crater 4096 h2.jpg
Coordinates 19°24′S 13°54′E / 19.4°S 13.9°E / -19.4; 13.9Coordinates: 19°24′S 13°54′E / 19.4°S 13.9°E / -19.4; 13.9
Diameter 45 km
Depth 3.5 km
Colongitude 346° at sunrise
Eponym Geber
LRO WAC mosaic

Geber is a lunar impact crater that is located in the rugged south-central highlands of the Moon. It lies half way between the crater Almanon to the north-northeast and the crater pair of Azophi and Abenezra to the south-southwest. Farther to the southeast is Sacrobosco. Geber is 45 kilometers in diameter and 3,510 meters deep.[1]

The rim of Geber is symmetrical and nearly circular, with only minor indentations at the north and south faces of its high, terraced wall. The floor is flat and lacks a significant central peak at the midpoint. The small satellite crater Geber B is attached to the northwest rim.[2][3] Geber is from the Nectarian period.[4]

In 1935, the crater was officially named after Jabir ibn Aflah (Latinized as Geber), a Spanish-Arab astronomer active in the first half of the twelfth century.[5]

Satellite craters[edit]

By convention these features are identified on lunar maps by placing the letter on the side of the crater midpoint that is closest to Geber.[6]

Geber Latitude Longitude Diameter
A 21.8° S 14.7° E 14 km
B 19.0° S 13.0° E 19 km
C 22.1° S 14.9° E 11 km
D 19.3° S 11.9° E 5 km
E 20.5° S 12.9° E 6 km
F 19.9° S 13.2° E 5 km
H 17.9° S 12.5° E 4 km
J 20.0° S 15.9° E 4 km
K 17.5° S 10.6° E 5 km

References[edit]

  1. ^ Autostar Suite Astronomer Edition. CD-ROM. Meade, April 2006.
  2. ^ Rükl, Antonín (1990). Atlas of the Moon. Kalmbach Books. ISBN 0-913135-17-8. 
  3. ^ Moore, Patrick (2001). On the Moon. Sterling Publishing Co.. ISBN 0-304-35469-4.
  4. ^ Stratigraphy of Lunar Craters, Don E. Wilhelms and Charles J. Byrne, January 23, 2009, Table 2.1
  5. ^ "Planetary Names: Crater, craters: Geber on Moon". Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature. International Astronomical Union. Retrieved 3 February 2015. 
  6. ^ Bussey, B.; Spudis, P. (2004). The Clementine Atlas of the Moon. New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-81528-2.