GelGreen

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GelGreen
GelGreen chemical structure.png
Names
IUPAC name
10,10'-(6,22-dioxo-11,14,17-trioxa-7,21-diazaheptacosane-1,27-diyl)bis(3,6-bis(dimethylamino)acridin-10-ium) iodide
Other names
Dye No. 20,[1] AOAO-13[1]
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
Properties
C56H80I2N8O5
Molar mass 1198.43 g/mol
Hazards
Safety data sheet 10,000X in water, Biotium Inc.
R-phrases (outdated) R25 R36/37/38
S-phrases (outdated) S22 S24/25 S26 S36/37/39 S45 S53
NFPA 704
Flammability code 0: Will not burn. E.g., water Health code 4: Very short exposure could cause death or major residual injury. E.g., VX gas Reactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogen Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Flash point > 100 °C (212 °F; 373 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

GelGreen is an intercalating nucleic acid stain used in molecular biology for agarose gel electrophoresis. GelGreen is structurally closely related to acridinium orange and consists of two acridinium orange subunits that are bridged by a linear spacer.[1][2]

Its fluorophore, and therefore its optical properties, are essentially identical to those of other N-alkylacridinium orange dyes. When exposed to ultraviolet light, it will fluoresce with a greenish color that strongly intensifies after binding to DNA.[3] The substance is marketed as a less toxic and more sensitive alternative to ethidium bromide.[3] GelGreen is sold as a solution in DMSO or, more recently, in water.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c US application 2010323453, Mao, Fei & Leung, Wai-Yee, "Methods of Using Dyes in Association with Nucleic Acid Staining or Detection and Associated Technology" 
  2. ^ GelRed & GelGreen (PDF), Biotium Inc., August 21, 2012, retrieved December 4, 2012 
  3. ^ a b c GelRed and GelGreen: Environmentally safe and ultra-sensitive nucleic acid gel stains for replacing EtBr, Biotium Inc., retrieved December 4, 2012