Genaro Hernández

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Genaro Hernández
Statistics
Nickname(s) Chicanito
Rated at
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Reach 72 in (183 cm)
Nationality American
Born (1966-05-10)May 10, 1966
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Died June 7, 2011(2011-06-07) (aged 45)
Stance Orthodox
Boxing record
Total fights 41
Wins 38
Wins by KO 17
Losses 2
Draws 1

Genaro Hernández (May 10, 1966 – June 7, 2011) was a Mexican-American professional boxer who competed from 1984 to 1998.[1][2][3] He was a two-time super featherweight world champion, having held the WBA title from 1991 to 1995, and the WBC and lineal titles from 1997 to 1998. Additionally, he challenged for the WBO lightweight title in 1995.

Professional career[edit]

Hernández, a Mexican-American, enjoyed a distinguished career as a professional boxer. His debut as a paid fighter came on September 27, 1984, when he beat Dino Ramirez by a decision in four rounds at Inglewood.[4] He racked up a record of 13–0 with 6 knockouts and a solid reputation as a future champion around Southern California, when he met former Julio César Chávez world title challenger Refugio Rojas on November 22, 1988. He beat Rojas, who had lasted seven rounds against Chávez, by a knockout in round six. This enabled Hernández to enter the WBA super featherweight rankings.[5] Hernandez went on to win seven more fights, four by knockout, including one over former world title challenger Felipe Orozco, and another, in his first professional fight abroad: a three round knockout over Leon Collins in Tokyo, Japan.[6]

WBA super featherweight champion[edit]

Exactly two years after his win over Rojas, Hernández got his first world title try, against Daniel Londas, on November 22, 1991 at Épernay, France. Hernández did not disappoint those who had predicted him to be a future world champion as he knocked out world champion Londas in nine rounds in front of Londas' hometown crowd, becoming World Junior Lightweight champion.[7] In 1992, he defended his crown twice, knocking out Omar Catari in six rounds and, travelling to Japan once more, defeating challengers Masuaki Takeda and Yuji Watanabe, Takeda by decision and Watanabe by knockout in six.[8]

His next fight proved historic, albeit for the wrong reasons. Defending on April 26, 1993, once again at Inglewood against former world featherweight champion Raúl Pérez, Hernández had to settle for a first round technical draw. This was the first, and so far only, world title fight in which no punches were landed. Right after the initial bell, Perez headbutted Hernández, and Perez bled profusely from an arteric vein on his forehead. The referee summoned the ring doctor, who decided the fight should be stopped as Perez required immediate surgery.[9] In the June 28 rematch later that year, Hernández retained the world title by a knockout in round eight. Hernandez then closed the year by defeating Harold Warren by decision to once again keep his title. In 1994, Hernandez retained the title twice, including a victory over Jimmy Garcia, (who would die later after a fight with Gabriel Ruelas). By the end of 1994, Hernández was clamoring for a world title fight against crosstown rival and WBO lightweight champion Oscar De La Hoya.[10]

After eight successful title defenses, Hernández vacated his WBA super featherweight title in order to face De La Hoya in the upcoming year. Hernández began 1995 by beating another Mexican boxing legend, Jorge Maromero Páez, by a knockout in eight rounds at Inglewood. The Hernández-Páez fight was overshadowed by another news that rattled the Latino world that day: The death of famed Tejano singer Selena Quintanilla.[11]

WBO lightweight title challenge[edit]

On September 9, the highly anticipated encounter between Hernández and de la Hoya took place in Las Vegas. Hernández lost for the first time in his career, retiring from the fight at the end of the sixth round, his nose bloody: He returned to his corner, but without sitting down motioned to his team that he did not want to continue the fight. Reportedly, he had come to the fight with a nose previously injured in a sparring session.[12] Up until the fight's end, the judges had de la Hoya holding a lead on all three scorecards. After the loss Hernández took some brief time off but by 1996 he was back inside the ring, winning two bouts that year.[13]

WBC and lineal super featherweight champion[edit]

In 1997, he fought what almost turned into another controversial fight when he challenged Azumah Nelson in a title bout for the WBC & Lineal super featherweight titles, in Corpus Christi, Texas.[14] Ahead on all scorecards at the end of round seven, he was hit in his throat by a Nelson punch after the bell. He needed some time to recuperate from the illegal late hit, and WBC President José Sulaiman came to his corner and informed him that if he could not continue he would be declared winner by disqualification.[15] Hernández told Sulaiman something along the lines of I want to win it like real champions do, and he went back to the fight at the beginning of round eight. The fight ended after twelve rounds and Hernández won the Super featherweight titles by defeating Nelson with a split decision victory.[16]

Hernández went on to defend his crown against such capable challengers as future super featherweight champion Anatoly Alexandrov, Carlos Gerena and another future world champion Carlos Famoso Hernandez, a gym-mate and personal friend who would later become El Salvador's first world boxing champion in history.[17]

In what would turn out to be his last fight, on October 3 of 1998 he lost his titles to Floyd Mayweather Jr. by an 8th round retirement.[18]

Retirement[edit]

In December 1998, after he was diagnosed with a blood clot and a torn cartilage muscle, he announced his retirement with a record of 38 wins, 2 losses and 1 draw, with 17 of those wins coming by knockout. He had intended to challenge WBC lightweight champion César Bazán before the diagnosis.[19]

Life after boxing[edit]

After retiring from boxing Hernández was diagnosed with stage four cancer of the head and neck, a very rare form of cancer, and one which Hernández' insurance would not cover for treatment. Although Hernández has collected several large purses in his career, including $600,000 for his final fight against Mayweather,[20] he was not able to afford his expensive treatments and benefits were held to assist in paying what insurance would not cover. Robert Arum, of Top Rank Promotions, who promoted Hernandez, footed Hernandez' bills for chemotherapy for a number of years, until he died, also having him brought to and from the chemotherapy sessions. In mid 2009 it was reported that Hernández' cancer was in remission[21] but in early 2010 the cancer had returned and Hernández was undergoing treatment.[22] On June 3, 2011, it was announced that Hernández would stop chemotherapy treatment.[23]

Hernández worked as a boxing instructor at the LA Boxing Gym in Lake Forest, California until early 2011. He helped out in a broadcast of a boxing match in Maywood after that.[24]

Death[edit]

Hernández died from cancer on June 7, 2011, at the age of 45 .[25]

Professional boxing record[edit]

Professional record summary
41 fights 38 wins 2 losses
By knockout 17 2
By decision 20 0
By disqualification 1 0
Draws 1
No. Result Record Opponent Type Round, time Date Location Notes
41 Loss 38–2–1 United States Floyd Mayweather Jr. RTD 8 (12), 3:00 Oct 3, 1998 United States Las Vegas Hilton, Winchester, Nevada, U.S. Lost WBC and lineal super featherweight titles
40 Win 38–1–1 Puerto Rico Carlos Gerena UD 12 May 16, 1998 United States Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, Indio, California, U.S. Retained WBC and lineal super featherweight titles
39 Win 37–1–1 United States Carlos Hernández UD 12 Nov 20, 1997 United States Grand Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California, U.S. Retained WBC and lineal super featherweight titles
38 Win 36–1–1 Kazakhstan Anatoly Alexandrov SD 12 Jun 14, 1997 United States Alamodome, San Antonio, Texas, U.S. Retained WBC and lineal super featherweight titles
37 Win 35–1–1 Ghana Azumah Nelson SD 12 Mar 22, 1997 United States Memorial Coliseum, Corpus Christi, Texas, U.S. Won WBC and lineal super featherweight titles
36 Win 34–1–1 Mexico Antonio Hernandez UD 10 Sep 28, 1996 United States Will Rogers Coliseum, Fort Worth, Texas, U.S.
35 Win 33–1–1 Mexico Javier Pichardo TKO 5 (10), 2:10 May 8, 1996 United States Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, Indio, California, U.S.
34 Loss 32–1–1 United States Oscar De La Hoya RTD 6 (12), 3:00 Sep 9, 1995 United States Caesars Palace, Paradise, Nevada, U.S. For WBO lightweight title
33 Win 32–0–1 Mexico Jorge Páez TKO 8 (10) Mar 31, 1995 United States Arrowhead Pond, Anaheim, California, U.S.
32 Win 31–0–1 Colombia Jimmy Garcia UD 12 Nov 12, 1994 Mexico Plaza de Toros, Mexico City, Mexico Retained WBA super featherweight title
31 Win 30–0–1 Mexico Jorge Ramirez TKO 8 (12), 2:35 Jan 31, 1994 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S. Retained WBA super featherweight title
30 Win 29–0–1 United States Harold Warren UD 12 Oct 11, 1993 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S. Retained WBA super featherweight title
29 Win 28–0–1 Mexico Raúl Pérez KO 8 (12), 2:11 Jun 28, 1993 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S. Retained WBA super featherweight title
28 Draw 27–0–1 Mexico Raúl Pérez TD 1 (12), 0:28 Apr 26, 1993 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S. Retained WBA super featherweight title;
TD after Pérez sustained a cut from an accidental head clash
27 Win 27–0 Japan Yuji Watanabe TKO 6 (12), 0:59 Nov 20, 1992 Japan Metropolitan Gymnasium, Tokyo, Japan Retained WBA super featherweight title
26 Win 26–0 Japan Masuaki Takeda UD 12 Jul 15, 1992 Japan Convention Center, Fukuoka, Japan Retained WBA super featherweight title
25 Win 25–0 Venezuela Omar Catarí UD 12 Feb 24, 1992 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S. Retained WBA super featherweight title
24 Win 24–0 France Daniel Londas TKO 9 (12), 1:07 Nov 22, 1991 France Complex Sport le COMEP, Épernay, France Won vacant WBA super featherweight title
23 Win 23–0 Puerto Rico Pedro Arroyo DQ 10 (10) Feb 11, 1991 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S.
22 Win 22–0 Mexico Rodolfo Gomez KO 5 (10), 2:00 Dec 6, 1990 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S.
21 Win 21–0 United States Ben Lopez TKO 6 (10), 2:06 Sep 22, 1990 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S.
20 Win 20–0 United States Richard Abila KO 3 (10), 2:18 Aug 27, 1990 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S.
19 Win 19–0 Philippines Leon Collins KO 3 (10) May 10, 1990 Japan Korakuen Hall, Tokyo, Japan
18 Win 18–0 Colombia Felipe Orozco UD 10 Jul 31, 1989 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S.
17 Win 17–0 Barbados Ed Pollard UD 10 May 15, 1989 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S.
16 Win 16–0 United States Refugio Rojas KO 6 (12) Nov 22, 1988 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S. Won vacant California super featherweight title
15 Win 15–0 Venezuela Jose Mosqueda UD 10 Jul 25, 1988 United States Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, U.S.
14 Win 14–0 Mexico Juan Manuel Vega TKO 9 (10) Apr 25, 1988 United States Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, U.S.
13 Win 13–0 United States Kenny Wyatt UD 10 Aug 31, 1987 United States Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, U.S.
12 Win 12–0 United States J L Ivey PTS 10 Dec 12, 1986 United States Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S.
11 Win 11–0 United States Lupe Miranda PTS 10 Sep 12, 1986 United States Sahara Hotel, Winchester, Nevada, U.S.
10 Win 10–0 United States Terry Baldwin TKO 7 Jul 21, 1986 United States Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, U.S.
9 Win 9–0 United States Jorge Valdez TKO 3 Apr 28, 1986 United States Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, U.S.
8 Win 8–0 United States Larry Villarreal UD 6 Mar 31, 1986 United States Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, U.S.
7 Win 7–0 United States Terry Baldwin KO 2 (6), 2:13 Feb 24, 1986 United States Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, U.S.
6 Win 6–0 United States Pablo Montano TKO 2 (6) Feb 17, 1986 United States Graham Central Station, Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.
5 Win 5–0 Mexico Jose Maytorena KO 1 Dec 12, 1985 United States Kern County Fairgrounds, Bakersfield, California, U.S.
4 Win 4–0 United States Randy Archuleta PTS 6 Oct 29, 1985 United States Stockton, California, U.S.
3 Win 3–0 United States Dino Ramirez UD 6 Jun 24, 1985 United States Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California, U.S.
2 Win 2–0 Mexico Martin Escobar UD 4 Nov 17, 1984 United States Grand Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California, U.S.
1 Win 1–0 United States Dino Ramirez PTS 4 Sep 27, 1984 United States Great Western Forum, Inglewood, California, U.S. Professional debut

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Martin (June 8, 2011). "Genaro Hernandez, Twice a World Champion, Dies at 45". The New York Times. 
  2. ^ "Falleció Genaro 'Chicanito' Hernandez - Univision Deportes". Deportes.univision.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  3. ^ Iole, Kevin (2011-06-09). "Mailbag: Remembering a true champ - Boxing - Yahoo! Sports". Sports.yahoo.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  4. ^ "RIP Genaro Hernandez". 8countnews.com. 2011-06-07. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  5. ^ "Genaro Hernandez Dead at 45: RSR Says Goodbye to the Two-Time World Champion". Ringside Report. 2011-06-08. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  6. ^ Dan RafaelBoxingArchive (2011-06-07). "Former 2-time champion Genaro Hernandez dead at 45 after battle with cancer - ESPN". Sports.espn.go.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  7. ^ "Genaro Hernandez Passes Away After Long Cancer Battle - Boxing News". Boxingscene.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  8. ^ "REST IN PEACE, Genaro Hernandez". Thesweetscience.com. 2011-06-07. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  9. ^ [1] Archived June 16, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.
  10. ^ "El Nuevo DÃa - Noticias de Puerto Rico, información de última hora y multimedia - El Nuevo Día". Elnuevodia.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  11. ^ "Genaro Hernandez verliert seinen schwersten Kampf | Boxen1 Boxen – Boxing – Boxkämpfe – Boxing-News – Box-Nachrichten". Boxen1.com. 2011-06-08. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  12. ^ https://books.google.com/books?id=K8NbAgAAQBAJ&pg=PT42&lpg=PT42&dq=genaro+hernandez+de+la+hoya+fight&source=bl&ots=gA6K0PGLRm&sig=_HIF5je6bRmgdEdGht9ayT_xgG8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CFUQ6AEwCGoVChMI3sjK4qmdxwIVgTI-Ch388AsO#v=onepage&q=genaro%20hernandez%20de%20la
  13. ^ "Falleció Genaro "El Chicanito" Hernández - Blog de Boxeo - ESPN Deportes". Espndeportes.espn.go.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  14. ^ "SecondsOut Boxing News - Other News - Genaro Hernandez Loses Cancer Battle". Secondsout.com. 2011-06-07. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  15. ^ "The Leading As Bigo Site on the Net". asbigo.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  16. ^ "Genaro Hernández - Lineal Jr. Lightweight Champion". The Cyber Boxing Zone Encyclopedia. 
  17. ^ Caribbean Cool says:. "WBC News: Genaro Hernandez passes away". Boxingnews24.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  18. ^ Bates, Ryan (2011-06-08). "Genaro Hernandez, 1966-2011". 3morerounds.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  19. ^ "Jackie Kallen: An Open letter to Genaro Hernandez". BoxingInsider.com. 2011-06-07. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  20. ^ "purse listings". Cyberboxingzone.com. Retrieved 2012-08-17. 
  21. ^ http://espndeportes.espn.go.com/news/story?id=887853&s=box&type=story
  22. ^ "Genaro Hernandez hangs tough in his toughest bout". Los Angeles Times. February 7, 2011. Retrieved June 1, 2011. 
  23. ^ "Genaro Hernández gives up chemotherapy". Ringtalk.com. June 3, 2011. Retrieved June 5, 2011. 
  24. ^ "Genaro Hernández hangs tough in his toughest bout". Los Angeles Times. February 7, 2011. Retrieved June 1, 2011. 
  25. ^ Pugmire, Lance (June 7, 2011). "Southland boxer Genaro Hernandez, a former world champion, dies at 45". Los Angeles Times. 

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Regional boxing titles
Vacant
Title last held by
Greg Puente
California super featherweight champion
November 22, 1988 – 1990
Vacated
Vacant
Title next held by
Ben Lopez
World boxing titles
Vacant
Title last held by
Joey Gamache
WBA super featherweight champion
November 22, 1991 – April 1995
Vacated
Vacant
Title next held by
Choi Yong-soo
Preceded by
Azumah Nelson
WBC super featherweight champion
March 22, 1997 – October 3, 1998
Succeeded by
Floyd Mayweather Jr.
Lineal super featherweight champion
March 22, 1997 – October 3, 1998