General Automation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
General Automation, Inc.
Public
Founded1968
HeadquartersAnaheim, California
Key people
Larry Goshorn, co-founder
ProductsMinicomputers

GA General Automation was an American company, founded in 1968 by Larry Goshorn (a former marketing executive and a salesman from Honeywell), which manufactured minicomputers and industrial controllers.

Products[edit]

  • GA SPC-12[1] (Jan 1968)
  • Priced at $6400 and claiming $4,000 worth of free options
  • Totally integrated, binary, parallel, single address processor
  • 4,096 words (8 bit bytes) of memory with a 2.2 microsecond cycle time
  • Shared command concept that permits the SPC-12s 8-bit memory to handle 12-bit instructions.
  • Features included a real-time clock, expandable memory to 16K, a teletype interface, a control panel and a priority interrupt
  • GA SPC-8 (Nov 1968)[2][3][4]
  • GA 18/30 (June 1968, IBM 1800 compatible)[5]
  • GA SPC-16/30, /50 & /70 (November 1971)[6]
  • GA SPC-16/40, /45, /65 & /85 (January 1972)[7]
  • LSI-12/16 (January 1974)[8]
These computers were initially produced with silicon on sapphire circuit technology[9] but yield problems caused a switch to conventional ICs by 1975.[10]
  • GA 16/110 & /120 (December 1976)[11]
  • GA 16/220
  • GA 16/330
  • GA 16/440
  • GA 16/460

References[edit]

  1. ^ Datamation, September 1968, p. 137
  2. ^ "Low Cost Computer Has 4K Memory". Computerworld. 2 (39): 7. 25 Sep 1968.
  3. ^ "Across the Editor's Desk - Computing and Data Processing Newsletter: SPC-8, A NEW GENERAL PURPOSE COMPUTER FROM GENERAL AUTOMATION, INC". Computers and Automation: 60. Oct 1968.
  4. ^ SPC-8 general purpose computer. General Automation, Inc. 1968.
  5. ^ Datamation, May 1969, p. 136
  6. ^ Datamation, November 15, 1971, p. 112
  7. ^ Datamation, January 1972, p. 5
  8. ^ Datamation, January 1974, p. 105
  9. ^ Datamation, January 1974, p. 105
  10. ^ Datamation, January 1975, p. 18
  11. ^ *"Mini Maker Offering Micro". December 6, 1976. Retrieved March 7, 2019.

External links[edit]