Departmental councils (France)

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The departmental councils (French: conseil départemental (sing.), conseils départemantaux (plur.)) of France are assemblies of the departments. Elected by universal suffrage, they were called general councils (conseil général (sing.), conseils généraux (plur.)) prior to March 2015.[1]

The president of a department council has a maximum allowance of €5,441 per month, the vice-presidents has a maximum allowance of €128.83-725.44, members of the standing committee have maximum allowances of €672.65-927.13, and departmental advisors have maximum allowances of €1,501-2,626 per month.[2]

History[edit]

The law of 22 December 1789 required the establishment of an assembly in each department, known as the council of the department.[3] This law was repealed on 4 December 1793; it was restored as the "law on the division of the territory of the Republic and its administration" on 17 February 1800, in which, "General Council of the departments" were formed.[4] At this time, the name "General Council" was also used by town and district councils.[5]

The members of the general council were not elected by suffrage until 1833; they were elected by universal suffrage from 3 July 1848. The first female president of a department council was Évelyne Baylet of Tarn-et-Garonne council.[6] Until the law of decentralisation on 2 March 1982, the department prefect also served as the department's state representative and the department executive; since 1982, the president of the council is the department's executive body.[7] Law 175 of 26 February 2008 means that there must be at least a single candidate of each gender in a department council election.[8]

List of the presidents of the departmental councils[edit]

Number Départment (or collectivity) Président Party Since
01 Ain Rachel Mazuir Socialist Party 2008
02 Aisne Yves Daudigny Socialist Party 2001
03 Allier Jean-Paul Dufregne French Communist Party 2008
04 Alpes-de-Haute-Provence Jean-Louis Bianco Socialist Party 1998
05 Hautes-Alpes Jean-Yves Dusserre Union for a Popular Movement 2008
06 Alpes-Maritimes Éric Ciotti Union for a Popular Movement 2008
07 Ardèche Pascal Terrasse Socialist Party 2006
08 Ardennes Benoît Huré Union for a Popular Movement 2004
09 Ariège Augustin Bonrepaux Socialist Party 2001
10 Aube Philippe Adnot Liberal and Moderate Movement 1990
11 Aude Marcel Rainaud Socialist Party 1998
12 Aveyron Jean-Claude Luche Union for a Popular Movement 2008
13 Bouches-du-Rhône Jean-Noël Guérini Socialist Party 1998
14 Calvados Anne d'Ornano Miscellaneous Right 1991
15 Cantal Vincent Descœur Union for a Popular Movement 2001
16 Charente Michel Boutant Socialist Party 2004
17 Charente-Maritime Dominique Bussereau Union for a Popular Movement 2008
18 Cher Alain Rafesthain Socialist Party 2004
19 Corrèze François Hollande Socialist Party 2008
2A Corse-du-Sud Jean-Jacques Panunzi Union for a Popular Movement 2006
2B Haute-Corse Joseph Castelli Left Radical Party 2010
21 Côte-d'Or François Sauvadet New Centre 2008
22 Côtes-d'Armor Claudy Lebreton Socialist Party 1997
23 Creuse Jean-Jacques Lozach Socialist Party 2001
24 Dordogne Bernard Cazeau Socialist Party 1994
25 Doubs Claude Jeannerot Socialist Party 2004
26 Drôme Didier Guillaume Socialist Party 2004
27 Eure Jean-Louis Destans Socialist Party 2001
28 Eure-et-Loir Albéric de Montgolfier Union for a Popular Movement 2001
29 Finistère Pierre Maille Socialist Party 1998
30 Gard Damien Alary Socialist Party 2001
31 Haute-Garonne Pierre Izard Socialist Party 1988
32 Gers Philippe Martin Socialist Party 1998
33 Gironde Philippe Madrelle Socialist Party 1988
34 Hérault André Vezinhet Socialist Party 1998
35 Ille-et-Vilaine Jean-Louis Tourenne Socialist Party 2004
36 Indre Louis Pinton Union for a Popular Movement 1998
37 Indre-et-Loire Claude Roiron Socialist Party 2008
38 Isère Alain Cottalorda Socialist Party 2014
39 Jura Jean Raquin Miscellaneous Right 2008
40 Landes Henri Emmanuelli Socialist Party 1982
41 Loir-et-Cher Maurice Leroy New Centre 2004
42 Loire Bernard Bonne Union for a Popular Movement 2008
43 Haute-Loire Gérard Roche Union for a Popular Movement 2004
44 Loire-Atlantique Patrick Mareschal Socialist Party 2004
45 Loiret Éric Doligé Union for a Popular Movement 1994
46 Lot Gérard Miquel Socialist Party 2004
47 Lot-et-Garonne Pierre Camani Socialist Party 2008
48 Lozère Jean-Paul Pourquier Union for a Popular Movement 2004
49 Maine-et-Loire Christophe Béchu Union for a Popular Movement 2004
50 Manche Jean-François Le Grand Union for a Popular Movement 1998
51 Marne René-Paul Savary Union for a Popular Movement 2003
52 Haute-Marne Bruno Sido Union for a Popular Movement 1998
53 Mayenne Jean Arthuis Miscellaneous Centre 1992
54 Meurthe-et-Moselle Michel Dinet Socialist Party 1998
55 Meuse Christian Namy Miscellaneous Right 2004
56 Morbihan Joseph-François Kerguéris Democratic Movement 2004
57 Moselle Philippe Leroy Union for a Popular Movement 1992
58 Nièvre Marcel Charmant Socialist Party 2001
59 Nord Patrick Kanner Socialist Party 1998
60 Oise Yves Rome Socialist Party 2004
61 Orne Alain Lambert Union for a Popular Movement 2007
62 Pas-de-Calais Dominique Dupilet Socialist Party 2004
63 Puy-de-Dôme Jean-Yves Gouttebel Socialist Party 2004
64 Pyrénées-Atlantiques Jean Castaings Union for a Popular Movement 2008
65 Hautes-Pyrénées Josette Durrieu Socialist Party 2008
66 Pyrénées-Orientales Christian Bourquin Socialist Party 1998
67 Bas-Rhin Guy-Dominique Kennel Union for a Popular Movement 2008
68 Haut-Rhin Charles Buttner Union for a Popular Movement 2004
69 Rhône Michel Mercier Miscellaneous Centre 1990
70 Haute-Saône Yves Krattinger Socialist Party 2002
71 Saône-et-Loire Arnaud Montebourg Socialist Party 2008
72 Sarthe Roland du Luart Union for a Popular Movement 1998
73 Savoie Hervé Gaymard Union for a Popular Movement 2008
74 Haute-Savoie Christian Monteil Miscellaneous Right 2008
75 Paris Bertrand Delanoë Socialist Party 2001
76 Seine-Maritime Didier Marie Socialist Party 2004
77 Seine-et-Marne Vincent Eblé Socialist Party 2004
78 Yvelines Pierre Bédier Union for a Popular Movement 2005
79 Deux-Sèvres Éric Gautier Socialist Party 2008
80 Somme Christian Manable Socialist Party 2008
81 Tarn Thierry Carcenac Socialist Party 1991
82 Tarn-et-Garonne Jean-Michel Baylet Left Radical Party 1986
83 Var Horace Lanfranchi Union for a Popular Movement 2002
84 Vaucluse Claude Haut Socialist Party 2001
85 Vendée Philippe de Villiers Movement for France 1988
86 Vienne Claude Bertaud Union for a Popular Movement 2008
87 Haute-Vienne Marie-Françoise Pérol-Dumont Socialist Party 2004
88 Vosges Christian Poncelet Union for a Popular Movement 1976
89 Yonne Jean-Marie Rolland Union for a Popular Movement 2008
90 Territoire de Belfort Yves Ackermann Socialist Party 2004
91 Essonne Michel Berson Socialist Party 1998
92 Hauts-de-Seine Patrick Devedjian Union for a Popular Movement 2007
93 Seine-Saint-Denis Claude Bartolone Socialist Party 2008
94 Val-de-Marne Christian Favier French Communist Party 2001
95 Val-d’Oise Arnaud Bazin Union for a Popular Movement 2011
971 Guadeloupe Jacques Gillot United Guadeloupe, Socialism and Realities 2001
972 Martinique Claude Lise Martinican Democratic Rally 1992
973 Guyane Alain Tien-Liong Miscellaneous Left 2008
974 Réunion Nassimah Dindar Union for a Popular Movement 2004
975 Saint-Pierre-et-Miquelon (overseas collect.) Stéphane Artano Archipelago Tomorrow 2006
976 Mayotte Ahmed Attoumani Douchina Union for a Popular Movement 2008

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ministère de l'intérieur, Les élections départementales : comprendre ce qui change (in French), retrieved 2015-07-30 
  2. ^ Circular of 9 October 2008 setting maximum allowances for local elected 1 st October 2008. Government of France.
  3. ^ "Law of 22 December 1789" (PDF). National Assembly. Retrieved 2 August 2015. 
  4. ^ "Law of 28 Pluviose year VIII" (PDF). U-Picarde. Retrieved 2 August 2015. 
  5. ^ "Les institutions administratives de la France de 1789 à 1800". University of Burgundy. 1988. Retrieved 2 August 2015. 
  6. ^ "Baylet. Women and Power". Senate of France. Retrieved 2 August 2015. 
  7. ^ "Law 82-213 of 2 March 1982 on the rights and freedoms of communes, departments and regions". Legifrance. Retrieved 2 August 2015. 
  8. ^ Law No. 175 of 26 February 2008 o facilitate equal access of women and men to the mandate of General Counsel.

External links[edit]