Generation Adidas Cup

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Generation Adidas Cup
Founded 2007
Region  United States
 Canada
Number of teams 12 (international division)
Current champions Argentina River Plate
Most successful club(s)

D.C. United (3 titles)

River Plate (3 titles)

The Generation adidas Cup (previously known as the SUM U-17 Cup) is a competition run by Major League Soccer for all U-17 MLS academy teams. As part of the "Home Grown Initiative," the Generation adidas Cup focused on player development while providing elite competition for those involved. From 2014 onwards international club sides have been invited to the competition to test MLS academies against foreign opposition, Stoke City of England became the first international winners of the tournament in the same year.[1]

The tournament served as a springboard into the professional game for some top prospects, such as Tristan Bowen (Los Angeles Galaxy), Andy Najar (D.C. United), Bryan Leyva (FC Dallas), Juan Agudelo (New York Red Bulls), Bill Hamid (D.C. United), Victor Ulloa (FC Dallas), and Ruben Luna (FC Dallas).

Competition[edit]

Competition The tournament initially consisted of four groups made up of four teams from foundation to 2012, with the top team from each group advancing to the single-game knockout stages. For the 2013-2014 season a new format was introduced, early in the season a qualifying tournament for domestic teams was held with the top nine sides plus three invitational foreign sides qualifying for the finals of the tournament in 2014.

The 2014 finals was contested with three groups of four teams with one foreign side in each group, with the group winners and the best runner up advancing to the knock out stage. A second "domestic" division is contested for MLS clubs with did not qualify for the finals proper.

For 2015 the "International Division" was renamed as the "Champions Division". As before there were three groups of four teams, however the number of foreign teams per group was increased to two meaning only the top six MLS academy teams qualified. The secondary domestic division was renamed as the "Premier Division" and one foreign team was invited to compete in each group.

Match format[edit]

Games consist of two 35 minute halves. In the group stages in the event of a draw a penalty shoot out is held to award an extra point. Draws after normal time in the knock out stage are settled with a penalty shoot out with no extra time played.

Finals[edit]

  • Finals were played over 1 leg.
Year Winners Score Runner–up Host
2007 United States D.C. United 3–0 United States Kansas City Wizards Dick's Sporting Goods Park, Commerce City, Colorado
2008 United States Real Salt Lake 1–1
(5–4p)
United States D.C. United Dick's Sporting Goods Park, Commerce City, Colorado
2009 United States D.C. United 1–1
(6–5p)
United States FC Dallas Dick's Sporting Goods Park, Commerce City, Colorado
2010 United States D.C. United 0–0
(5–4p)
United States Real Salt Lake Robertson Stadium, Houston, Texas
2011 United States Los Angeles Galaxy 2–0 United States FC Dallas Pizza Hut Park, Frisco, Texas
2012 United States Philadelphia Union 2–2
(4–3p)
Canada Toronto FC Starfire Sports Complex, Tukwila, Washington
2014[2] England Stoke City 1–1
(4–2p)
United States Real Salt Lake Toyota Stadium, Frisco, Texas
2015[3] Argentina River Plate 1–0 Germany Eintracht Frankfurt Toyota Stadium, Frisco, Texas
2016[4] Argentina River Plate 2–0 Chile Universidad de Chile Toyota Stadium, Frisco, Texas
2017[5] Argentina River Plate 2–1 Brazil Flamengo Toyota Stadium, Frisco, Texas

References[edit]

External links[edit]