Gente (magazine)

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Gente
Categories Current affairs magazine
Gossip magazine
Frequency Weekly
Circulation 332,340 (2010)
Founder Edilio Rusconi
Year founded 1957; 60 years ago (1957)
Company Hearst Magazines
Country Italy
Based in Milan
Language Italian
Website Gente
Not to be confused with the Argentine high society magazine Gente (Argentine magazine) (es).

Gente (meaning People in English)[1] is a popular and long-running Italian weekly current affairs[2] and celebrity gossip magazine.

History and profile[edit]

Gente was launched in Milan in 1957.[1] Its founder and publisher was Edilio Rusconi,[3] an Italian journalist, writer, publisher and film producer.[4] The magazine was the flagship of Rusconi Group.[5] The magazine was part of Rusconi Group until 1999 when the Group was acquired by Hachette Filipacchi Médias, a subsidiary of Lagardère SCA.[6]

The magazine was published by Hachette Rusconi under the Hachette Filipacchi Médias ownership.[7][8] It was owned by Hachette Filipacchi Médias[9] until 2011 when it was acquired by Hearst Magazines.[10][11] It is published on a weekly basis.[7][12]

Circulation[edit]

Gente had a circulation of 667,553 copies in 1984.[13] It rose to 769,185 copies between September 1993 and August 1994.[14] In 2000 the magazine had a circulation of 690,000 copies.[15] The 2004 circulation of the magazine was 573,000 copies.[16] It was 411,425 copies in 2007.[17][18] Its circulation was 332,340 copies in 2010.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The most important Italian magazines". Life in Italy. Retrieved 10 August 2014. 
  2. ^ Nico Pitrelli; Federica Manzoli; Barbara Montolli (2006). "Science in advertising: uses and consumptions in the Italian press" (PDF). Public Understanding of Science. 15 (2). doi:10.1177/0963662506061126. Retrieved 3 December 2014. 
  3. ^ Encyclopedia of Italian Literary Studies: A-J. Taylor & Francis. p. 980. ISBN 978-1-57958-390-3. Retrieved 27 April 2015. 
  4. ^ "Edilio Rusconi". Brand Milano. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  5. ^ Philip Cooke (10 May 2011). The Legacy of the Italian Resistance. Palgrave Macmillan. p. 98. ISBN 978-0-230-11901-7. Retrieved 27 April 2015. 
  6. ^ "Hachette Filipacchi Médias acquiert la majorité du Groupe Rusconi" (Press release). Lagardère Group (in French). Paris. 3 February 1999. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c "World Magazine Trends 2010/2011" (PDF). FIPP. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 2 April 2015. 
  8. ^ Maria Lombardo (2009). Giornali d'Europa. editpress. p. 33. ISBN 978-88-89726-30-3. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  9. ^ Marco Mazzoni; Antonio Ciaglia (2013). "How Italian politics goes popular: Evidence from an empirical analysis of gossip magazines and TV shows" (PDF). International Journal of Cultural Studies. doi:10.1177/1367877913496199. Retrieved 3 December 2014. 
  10. ^ "French Lagardere sells international magazines to Hearst". Publicitas. 31 January 2011. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  11. ^ Daniele Lepido (6 July 2011). "Il gruppo Hearst fa shopping nei periodici italiani". Il Sole 24 Ore (in Italian). Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  12. ^ Mark Gilbert; Robert K. Nilsson (19 September 2007). Historical Dictionary of Modern Italy. Scarecrow Press. p. 355. ISBN 978-0-8108-6428-3. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  13. ^ Maria Teresa Crisci. "Relationships between numbers of readers per copy and the characteristics of magazines" (PDF). The Print and Digital Research Forum. Retrieved 14 April 2015. 
  14. ^ "Top paid-circulation consumer magazines". Ad Age. 17 April 1995. Retrieved 15 March 2015. 
  15. ^ "Top 50 General Interest magazines worldwide (by circulation)" (PDF). Magazine.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 January 2015. Retrieved 17 January 2015. 
  16. ^ "European Publishing Monitor. Italy" (PDF). Turku School of Economics and KEA. Retrieved 7 April 2015. 
  17. ^ "Dati ADS (tirature e vendite)". Fotografi (in Italian). Archived from the original on 24 April 2015. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  18. ^ Anne Austin et. al. (2008). "Western Europe Market and Media Fact" (PDF). Zenith Optimedia. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 February 2015. Retrieved 10 April 2015. 

External links[edit]