Geoff Brown (tennis)

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Geoff Brown
Full name Geoffrey Edmund Brown
Country (sports)  Australia
Born (1924-04-04) 4 April 1924 (age 92)
Turned pro 1945 (amateur tour)
Retired 1958
Plays Ambidextrous
Singles
Highest ranking No. 10 (1946, Pierre Gillou)[1]
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open SF (1946, 1948, 1949)
Wimbledon F (1946)
US Open 4R (1947)
Doubles
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open F (1949)
Wimbledon F (1946, 1950)
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Wimbledon F (1946, 1950)

Geoffrey Edmund "Geoff" Brown (born 4 April 1924) is a former Australian male tennis player, born in Murrurundi, New South Wales, Australia. He attended Parramatta Marist High School in 1938-9 before joining the R.A.A.F as a gunner. He was demobilised at the end of the war and returned to playing tennis.

Brown was runner-up in the 1946 Wimbledon Championships singles final, losing in five sets to Yvon Petra, and doubles final playing with Dinny Pails.[2] He also reached the doubles finals at the 1949 Australian Championships and 1950 Wimbledon Championships, in both he was partnered by compatriot Bill Sidwell and in both finals they lost to John Bromwich and Adrian Quist.[3][4][5][6] He reached the quarterfinal at the 1949 Wimbledon Championships by defeating US champion Pancho Gonzales in the fourth round.[7][8]

With his countryman Dinny Pails he won the doubles title at the Irish Tennis Championships in July 1946.[9] He won the singles title at the Kent Lawn Tennis Championships in 1948 and 1950.[10][11][12] In April 1949 he reached the final of the South African Championships in Johannesburg but lost in four sets to Eric Sturgess.[13][14] In April 1950 Brown won the Surrey Tennis Tournament against Paddy Robert in the final.[15][16] In May he played in the British Hard Court Championships in Bournemouth and reached the final in which he lost to Jaroslav Drobný.[17][18] In June he defeated Sumant Misra in the singles final of the Northern Lawn Tennis Championships.[19] Due to an illness and operation Brown did not play tennis for more than a year and returned in October 1951.[20] In October 1952 he won the Sydney Metropolitan Grasscourt Championships, defeating Lew Hoad in the final in three sets.[21][22]

In 1947 and 1948 Brown played for the Australian Davis Cup team and compiled a record of three wins and one loss.[23]

Grand Slam finals[edit]

Singles (1 runner-up)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Opponent Score
Runner-up 1946 Wimbledon Championships Grass France Yvon Petra 2–6, 4–6, 9–7, 7–5, 4–6

Doubles (3 runners-up)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score
Runner-up 1946 Wimbledon Grass Australia Dinny Pails United States Tom Brown
United States Jack Kramer
4–6, 4–6, 2–6
Runner-up 1949 Australian Championships Grass Australia Bill Sidwell Australia John Bromwich
Australia Adrian Quist
6–1, 5–7, 2–6, 3–6
Runner-up 1950 Wimbledon Grass Australia Bill Sidwell Australia John Bromwich
Australia Adrian Quist
5–7, 6–3, 3–6, 6–3, 2–6

Mixed doubles (2 runners-up)[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents Score
Runner-up 1946 Wimbledon Grass United States Dorothy Cheney United States Louise Brough
United States Tom Brown
4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 1950 Wimbledon Grass United States Patricia Canning Todd United States Louise Brough Clapp
South Africa Eric Sturgess
9–11, 6–1, 4–6

References[edit]

  1. ^ United States Lawn Tennis Association (1972). Official Encyclopedia of Tennis (First Edition), p. 425.
  2. ^ "Petra New World Champion – Geoff Brown Goes Down Fighting". The Indian Express. 6 July 1946. 
  3. ^ "Players – Geoffrey Brown". Davis Cup Official Website. International Tennis Federation. 
  4. ^ "Player Biography – Geoffrey Brown". ITF Mens Circuit. International Tennis Federation. 
  5. ^ "Men's Singles Finals 1877–2008". Wimbledon Website. All England Lawn Tennis Club. 
  6. ^ "Men's Doubles Finals 1884–2008". Wimbledon Website. All England Lawn Tennis Club. Archived from the original on 3 November 2013. 
  7. ^ "Brown Brilliant to beat U.S. Champion". The Age. 28 June 1949. 
  8. ^ "TENNIS – BROWN SHINES AT WIMBLEDON". Townsville Daily Bulletin. Qld.: National Library of Australia. 27 June 1949. p. 2. 
  9. ^ "IRISH TITLES TO AUSTRALIANS.". The Advertiser. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 15 July 1946. p. 7. 
  10. ^ "LAWN TENNIS SINGLES TITLE.". The Cairns Post. Qld.: National Library of Australia. 19 June 1950. p. 1. 
  11. ^ "GEOFF BROWN WINS KENT SINGLES TITLE.". Townsville Daily Bulletin. Qld.: National Library of Australia. 19 June 1950. p. 4. 
  12. ^ "BROWN DEFEATS SI DWELL AFTER THREE-HOUR STRUGGLE.". The Advocate. Burnie, Tas.: National Library of Australia. 19 June 1950. p. 15. 
  13. ^ "S. AFRICAN TENNIS BROWN ENTERS FINAL.". The Advocate. Burnie, Tas.: National Library of Australia. 14 April 1949. p. 20. 
  14. ^ "Brown Beaten". The Sydney Morning Herald. 17 April 1949. 
  15. ^ "Brown Takes Surrey Tennis". The New York Times. 29 April 1950. 
  16. ^ "Tennis Win in 30 Minutes.". The West Australian. Perth: National Library of Australia. 1 May 1950. p. 21. 
  17. ^ "Brown-Drobny in U.K. Final.". The Sydney Morning Herald. National Library of Australia. 6 May 1950. p. 10. 
  18. ^ "FRANK SEDGMAN IN FORM.". The Examiner. Launceston, Tas.: National Library of Australia. 8 May 1950. p. 13. 
  19. ^ "TENNIS.". Townsville Daily Bulletin. Qld.: National Library of Australia. 12 June 1950. p. 2. 
  20. ^ "BROWN BACK IN BIG TENNIS.". The Sydney Morning Herald. National Library of Australia. 3 October 1951. p. 11. 
  21. ^ "Brown has win over Lew Hoad.". The Mail. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 18 October 1952. p. 29. 
  22. ^ "GEOFF BROWN IN COMEBACK.". Sunday Times. Perth: National Library of Australia. 19 October 1952. p. 3 Section: Sporting Section. 
  23. ^ "Davis Cup – Players – Geoffrey Brown". ITF. 

External links[edit]