Geoffrey de Mandeville (11th century)

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Geoffrey de Mandeville alias de Magnaville (Latinized to: de Magna Villa ("from the great town")), (died c. 1100), Constable of the Tower of London.[1][2] He was a Norman from Magna Villa in the Duchy of Normandy. There are a number of communes that were anciently referred to as Magna Villa such as Manneville-la-Goupil, Mannevillette[3] and others. Some records may indicate he was from today's Thil-Manneville, in Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandy (upper Normandy).[1][4][5]

He is the direct lineal ancestor of Anne Boleyn and her daughter Elizabeth I.

Life[edit]

An important Domesday tenant-in-chief, de Mandeville was one of the ten richest magnates of the reign of William the Conqueror. William granted him large estates, primarily in Essex, but in ten other shires as well.[6] He served as the first sheriff of London and Middlesex,[7] and perhaps also in Essex, and in Hertfordshire. He was the progenitor of the de Mandeville Earls of Essex.[8] About 1085 he and Lescelina, his second wife, founded Hurley Priory as a cell of Westminster Abbey.[9][10]

Family[edit]

He married firstly, Athelaise (Adeliza) (d. bef. 1085),[9] by whom he had:

  • Walter, who was also one of his tenants in 1086.[1]

He married secondly Lescelina, by whom he had no children.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday People, I Domesday Book, (Boydell Press, 1999) pp. 226–7
  2. ^ Ronald Sutherland Gower, The Tower of London, Vol. ii (George Bell & Sons, 1902), p. 179
  3. ^ http://www.villages76.com/pagesmannevillette/ecolehistorique.html#histoire Mannevillette History (in French)
  4. ^ Lewis Christopher Loyd, The origins of some Anglo-Norman Famillies, (Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1999) pp. 57–8
  5. ^ Alexander Malet, The Conquest of England, (Bell and Daldy, London, 1860) p. 191 n. 18
  6. ^ J. H. Round, Geoffrey de Mandeville, (Longmans, Green, 1892), p. 37
  7. ^ David C. Douglas,William the Conqueror (University of California Press, 1964). p. 297
  8. ^ George Edward Cokayne, The Complete Peerage, Vol. V (The St. Catherine Press, Ltd., London, 1926), pp. 113–16
  9. ^ a b K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday People, I Domesday Book, (Boydell Press, 1999) p. 227
  10. ^ J. H. Round, Geoffrey de Mandeville, (Longmans, Green, 1892), p. 38
  11. ^ K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday People, I Domesday Book, (Boydell Press, 1999), p. 194
  12. ^ K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday People, I Domesday Book, (Boydell Press, 1999), p. 229
  13. ^ Ann Williams, G.H. Martin, Domesday Book; A Complete Translation, (Penguin Books, 1992) p. 85

Additional references[edit]

  • Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700 by Frederick Lewis Weis, Line 158A-23.
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Unknown
Constable of the Tower of London
1086–1100
Succeeded by
William de Mandeville
  1. ^ K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday People, I Domesday Book, (Boydell Press, 1999), p. 229
  2. ^ Ann Williams, G.H. Martin, Domesday Book; A Complete Translation, (Penguin Books, 1992) p. 85
  3. ^ a b c d e f Claire, 2013. Anne Boleyn’s Family Tree, www.theanneboleynfiles.com, February 8
  4. ^ The Boleyn Family, www.englishmonarchs.co.uk
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Elizabeth Norton, 2013. The Boleyn Women, Amberley Publishing
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i Tricia J Mccall, Ancestors of William Henry Cress Generation, www.genealogy.com, Generation Page No. 21, 20, 19, 18, 17
  7. ^ a b BOLEYN FAMILY, www.tudorplace.com