List of Star Wars planets and moons

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The fictional universe of the Star Wars franchise features multiple planets and moons. While only the feature films and selected other works are considered canon to the franchise since the 2012 acquisition of Lucasfilm by The Walt Disney Company, some canon planets were first named or explored in works from the non-canon Star Wars expanded universe, now rebranded Star Wars Legends.

Canon[edit]

The following list names prominent planets and moons from the Star Wars films or other canon media.

Name First appearance Year Media Fictional description Ref.
Ahch-To Star Wars: The Force Awakens 2015 Film Oceanic planet on which Luke Skywalker has been hiding for six years, and the location of the first Jedi Temple. [1]
Alderaan Star Wars 1977 Film Princess Leia's home planet. Destroyed by the first Death Star as a demonstration of power. [2]
Anoat Empire Strikes Back, TheThe Empire Strikes Back 1980 Film (mentioned) A nearly inhospitable planet used by the Empire. [3]
Star Wars: Dark Forces (Star Wars Legends) 1995 Video game
Atollon Star Wars Rebels 2016 TV series Desert covered planet, site of Phoenix Squadron Rebel base. Home of the spider-like Krykna. [4]
Bespin Empire Strikes Back, TheThe Empire Strikes Back 1980 Film Gas planet and the location of Cloud City. [5][6]
Concord Dawn The Last One Standing: The Tale of Boba Fett (Legends) 1996 Short story Home planet of Jango Fett. Habitable planet that is surrounded by a large amount of debris from many vicious wars. Formerly controlled by the Mandalorians. [7]
Star Wars Rebels 2016 TV series
Corellia Star Wars 1977 Film (mentioned) Homeworld of Han Solo. An industrial planet with a strong culture of training pilots. [8]
The Corellian Trilogy (Legends) 1995 Book
Coruscant Heir to the Empire (Legends) 1991 Book Urban world consists of a planet-wide city. Governmental center of the Galactic Republic and later the Galactic Empire. [5][9]
Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace 1999 Film
D'Qar Star Wars: The Force Awakens 2015 Film Site of a Resistance operations base led by General Leia Organa. [10]
Dagobah Empire Strikes Back, TheThe Empire Strikes Back 1980 Film Swamp planet and Yoda's residence after the fall of the Jedi. [2]
Dantooine Star Wars 1977 Film (mentioned) Rural planet and the former site of a Rebel base. [11]
Jedi Search (Legends) 1994 Book
Dathomir The Courtship of Princess Leia (Legends) 1994 Book Han Solo wins the planet in a card game and lures Princess Leia there to stop her from marrying someone else, and Luke Skywalker discovers that the infamous Nightsisters live there. [9]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2011 TV series Homeworld of the Force-sensitive Nightsisters, including Asajj Ventress. Darth Maul's training ground. [12][13][14]
Devaron Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina (Legends) 1995 Book Forest planet with an ancient Jedi Temple. [15]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2009 TV series
Endor Return of the Jedi 1983 Film Forest moon that the second Death Star orbited. Inhabited by Ewoks. The location of the battle between the Rebel Alliance and the Empire leading to the destruction of the second Death Star. [16]
Felucia Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith 2005 Film Jungle planet teeming with plants but little animal life. Aayla Secura was assassinated here during the Jedi Purge. [17]
Geonosis Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones 2002 Film Rocky desert planet where battle droids are manufactured, and the site of the opening battle of the Clone Wars. All life on the planet is presumed destroyed by the Empire in Star Wars Rebels. Close to Tatooine. [18]
Hosnian Prime Star Wars: The Force Awakens 2015 Film Urban planet and capital of the New Republic.[19] Destroyed by the First Order's Starkiller Base. [10]
Hoth Empire Strikes Back, TheThe Empire Strikes Back 1980 Film Desolate ice planet and base for the Rebel Alliance. [5]
Ilum Path to Truth (Legends) 2001 Book Remote ice planet where the crystals that focus lightsabers are mined. [20]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2012 TV series
Iridonia Star Wars Episode I Journal: Darth Maul (Legends) 2000 Book Rumored birthplace of Darth Maul. [21]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2011 TV series (mentioned)
Jakku Star Wars: The Force Awakens 2015 Film Desert planet. Site of a "graveyard" of ships damaged during the final battle between the Rebel Alliance and the Empire.[22] [10]
Jedha Rogue One 2016 Film Cold desert planet, and a sacred place for believers in The Force. [23]
Kamino Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones 2002 Film Ocean planet where cloning technology is developed and the Clone Army is created and trained. [2][6]
Kashyyyk Star Wars Holiday Special (Legends) 1978 TV film Forest planet and home of the Wookiees. Also the site of one of the final battles of the Clone Wars. [24]
Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith 2005 Film
Kessel Star Wars 1977 Film (mentioned) A mining planet which has been fought over by crime lords for its valuable spice. [25]
Jedi Search (Legends) 1994 Book
Lothal Star Wars Rebels 2014 TV series Remote farm planet and birthplace of Ezra Bridger. [26]
Malachor Star Wars Rebels 2016 TV series Desolate Sith temple world and site of two major battles: the Scourge of Malachor thousands of years ago and an engagement between Darth Maul, several Rebels, Darth Vader, and several Inquisitors. [27]
Malastare Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace 1999 Film (mentioned) Swamp planet where podracing is popular. Birthplace of Sebulba. [28]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2010 TV series
Mandalore Marvel Star Wars (Legends) 1982 Comics Formerly habitable planet and the subject of legends due to its history of Mandalorian warriors. [29]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2010 TV series
Maridun Star Wars: Empire (Legends) 2004 Comics Grassy planet remaining undiscovered until the Clone Wars. [30]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2009 TV series
Mon Calamari Dark Empire (Legends) 1991 Comics Ocean planet, home to the Mon Calamari and Quarren species. [6][31]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2011 TV series
Moraband Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2014 TV series Home planet of ancient Sith lords. Known as Korriban in Legends. [32]
Mortis Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2011 TV series Planet with a wall surrounding it, inhabited by Force wielders. [33]
Mustafar Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith 2005 Film Volcanic planet, former stronghold of the Confederacy and the location of the first showdown between Darth Vader and Obi-Wan Kenobi. [34]
Mygeeto Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith 2005 Film Cold, urban planet where Ki Adi Mundi is killed. [35]
Naboo Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace 1999 Film Home planet of the Gungans, including Jar-Jar Binks, and various humans, who comprise a civilization called the Naboo, which include Padmé Amidala and Emperor Palpatine. [34]
Nal Hutta Dark Empire (Legends) 1991 Comics Home planet of Jabba and other Hutts. Close to the space station Nar Shaada. [36]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2010 TV series
Onderon Tales of the Jedi (Legends) 1994 Comics Jungle planet where Anakin Skywalker leads a revolt against its monarchy. [37]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2012 TV series
Polis Massa Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith 2005 Film Outer Rim planetoid within an asteroid field of the same name; birthplace of Luke Skywalker and Leia Organa. [38]
Rishi Dark Force Rising (Legends) 1992 Book Tropical planet used by the Republic to monitor the nearby cloning facility on Kamino. [39]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2008 TV series
Rodia Shadows of the Empire (Legends) 1996 Book Home planet of Greedo and other Rodians. [40]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2008 TV series
Ruusan Star Wars Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II (Legends) 1997 Video game Barren planet housing the Valley of the Jedi. [41]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2008 TV series
Ryloth Tales from Jabba's Palace (Legends) 1995 Book Dry, hot home planet of Oola and other Twi'leks. [42]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2009 TV series
Scarif Rogue One 2016 Film Oceanic "paradise world" with tropical islands. [43]
Shili Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2012 TV series Home of Jedi Council member Shaak Ti and Ahsoka Tano. [44]
Starkiller Base Star Wars: The Force Awakens 2015 Film Snowy planet of forested mountains converted by the First Order into a super weapon. Destroyed by the Resistance. [10]
Sullust Return of the Jedi 1983 Film (mentioned) Volcanic planet. Base of Imperial factories. [6][45]
Star Wars: Rogue Squadron (Legends) 1998 Video game
Takodana Star Wars: The Force Awakens 2015 Film Forest planet and site of Maz Kanata's castle. Neutral territory between First Order and Resistance.[46] [10]
Tatooine Star Wars 1977 Film Desert planet and childhood home of Anakin Skywalker (Darth Vader) and Luke Skywalker. Location of Jabba's place. [5]
Toydaria Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2010 TV series Home planet of Watto and other Toydarians. Close to Nal Hutta. [47]
Trandosha The Mandalorian Armor (Legends) 1998 Book (mentioned) Homeworld of the Trandoshan hunters. Close to Kashyyyk. [48]
Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2011 TV series
Umbara Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2011 TV series Planet with a thick, foggy atmosphere. Home to the Umbarans. [49]
Utapau Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith 2005 Film Remote planet, covered in deep sinkholes. Location of a Separatist base. Site of General Grievous' defeat. [18]
Yavin Star Wars 1977 Film Gas planet with several moons, including Yavin 4. [5]
Yavin 4 Star Wars 1977 Film Forest moon and base for the Rebel Alliance. [5]

Similarities to real world planets[edit]

NASA reported in 2015 that some planets in the fictional Star Wars universe possess similarities to scientifically confirmed exoplanets in the real-world universe: Coruscant (Earth-like world) is like Kepler-452b; Tatooine (world with twin suns) is like Kepler-16b and Kepler-453b; Hoth (cold world) is like OGLE-2005-BLG-390Lb; Mustafar (hot molten world) is like Kepler-10b and Kepler-78b; and Kamino (ocean world) is like Kepler-22b.[50] There are also similarities to Alderaan (Princess Leia's home planet) and Endor (the Ewoks' forested exomoon) in the real-world universe, according to NASA.[50]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitbrook, James (January 1, 2016). "New Details From the Force Awakens Script Hint at Episode VIII Secrets". io9. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Wenz, John (April 23, 2015). "Could the Planets in Star Wars Actually Support Life?". Wired. Retrieved October 23, 2015. 
  3. ^ Smith, Tony (November 5, 2012). "Lucas Arts' Dark Forces". The Register. Retrieved January 11, 2016. 
  4. ^ "Databank: Atollon". StarWars.com. Retrieved April 9, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f Chao, Tom (September 14, 2012). "10 Real Alien Worlds That Resemble Star Wars Planets". Space.com. Retrieved October 23, 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c d Capps, Kriston (November 28, 2014). "Of Course There Are Black Stormtroopers in Star Wars". The Atlantic. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  7. ^ "The CLone Wars Season 4 Episode 17 and 18 Review". Star Wars Report. 2012-02-25. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  8. ^ Wallace p. 60
  9. ^ a b "Star Wars: The Courtship of Princess Leia (Review)". Kirkus Reviews. May 20, 2010. Retrieved December 7, 2015. 
  10. ^ a b c d e De Semlyen, Phil (November 26, 2015). "Exclusive: Empire reveals names of new Star Wars planets". Empire. Retrieved November 28, 2015. Joining Tatooine, Endor, Naboo and the already-revealed desert planet of Jakku are Takodana, D'Qar and Hosnian Prime. 
  11. ^ Wallace p. 66
  12. ^ Blauvelt, Christian (January 8, 2011). "Star Wars: The Clone Wars recap: Here come the Nightsisters!". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved January 13, 2016. 
  13. ^ Wallace p. 70
  14. ^ "Databank: Darth Maul". StarWars.com. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  15. ^ Walters, Samuel (2009-10-03). "2.02 — Cargo of Doom — Clone Wars Review". Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  16. ^ Cavelos, Jeanne (2007). The Science of Star Wars: An Astrophysicist's Independent Examination of Space Travel, Aliens, Planets, and Robots as Portrayed in the Star Wars Films and Books. Macmillan. pp. 29–32. ISBN 978-1-4299-7176-8. 
  17. ^ Luceno p. 41
  18. ^ a b Nicholson, Max (May 4, 2015). "49 Things The Star Wars Prequels Did Absolutely Right". MTV News. Retrieved October 27, 2015. ...they also brought in a supercluster’s worth of new planets, including Coruscant, Naboo, Kamino, Geonosis, Utapau, Mustafar, Kashyyyk and plenty of others in Episode III. 
  19. ^ Hidalgo 2015, p. 9.
  20. ^ Goldman, Eric (2012-11-03). "Star Wars: The Clone Wars — "The Gathering" Review". IGN. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  21. ^ Goldman, Eric (2011-01-21). "Star Wars: The Clone Wars — "Witches of the Mist" Review". IGN. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  22. ^ Hidalgo 2015, pp. 34–35.
  23. ^ Breznican, Anthony (August 8, 2016). "Rogue One director reveals new details on Force-sacred world Jedha". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved August 16, 2016. 
  24. ^ Taylor, Chris (2015). How Star Wars Conquered the Universe: The Past, Present, and Future of a Multibillion Dollar Franchise. Basic Books. pp. 222–223. ISBN 978-0-465-04989-9. 
  25. ^ Wallace p. 108
  26. ^ Day, Patrick Kevin (October 3, 2014). "Star Wars Rebels: Ralph McQuarrie legacy on view in animated series". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 27, 2015. The heroes of Rebels hail from a backwoods planet called Lothal, which bears a close resemblance to McQuarrie's vision of Alderaan. 
  27. ^ Nelson, James (February 16, 2016). "Star Wars Rebels is secretly making the Old Republic canon". Nerd Union. Retrieved April 16, 2016. 
  28. ^ Walters, Samuel (2010-08-18). "2.18 — The Zillo Beast — Clone Wars Review". Dauntless Media. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  29. ^ Blauvelt, Christian (2010-10-09). "Star Wars: The Clone Wars recap: White lies, black markets". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 2016-01-28. 
  30. ^ Walters, Samuel (2009-01-17). "1.13 — Jedi Crash — Clone Wars Review". Dauntless Media. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  31. ^ Blauvelt, Christian (September 16, 2011). "Star Wars: The Clone Wars: Check out the season premiere's underwater action". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved January 13, 2016. 
  32. ^ Hide, Viral (February 27, 2014). "Officially the name of the Sith homeworld is Moraband". Star Wars News Net. Retrieved January 13, 2016. 
  33. ^ Blauvelt, Christian (2011-01-29). "Star Wars: The Clone Wars recap: Liam Neeson strikes back". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  34. ^ a b Staff (October 28, 2010). "The Worlds of Star Wars". National Geographic. Retrieved October 23, 2015. 
  35. ^ Brogan, Jacob (February 18, 2015). "Han Solo Shot First". The Atlantic. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  36. ^ Blauvelt, Christian (November 13, 2010). "Star Wars: The Clone Wars recap: Some like it Hutt". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved January 13, 2016. 
  37. ^ Goldman, Eric (2012-10-06). "Star Wars: The Clone Wars — "A War on Two Fronts" Review". IGN. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  38. ^ "Databank: Polis Massa". StarWars.com. Retrieved February 10, 2016. 
  39. ^ Skye, Lillian (2014-03-12). "Clone Wars Review: "Order 66" Arc". Star Wars Underworld. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  40. ^ Goldman, Eric (November 24, 2008). "Star Wars: The Clone Wars - 'Bombad Jedi' Review". IGN. Retrieved January 13, 2016. 
  41. ^ Weller, Scott (2013-08-08). "'The Clone Wars' Season One. Aficionado's Top 5 Episodes Number 4. Duel of the Droids". Star Wars Aficionado. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  42. ^ Goldman, Eric (January 20, 2009). "Star Wars: The Clone Wars - 'Jedi Crash' Review". IGN. Retrieved January 13, 2016. 
  43. ^ Skrebels, Joe (July 15, 2016). "Star Wars Celebration 2016: New Rogue One Planet, Scarif Revealed". IGN. Retrieved August 16, 2016. 
  44. ^ Fessler, Mike (2012-11-06). "Verse's Review: The Clone Wars 5.6 The Gathering". Versifier Unleashed. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  45. ^ Chalk, Andy (May 3, 2015). "Star Wars: Battlefront has 12 multiplayer maps including the planet Sullust". PC Gamer. Retrieved October 27, 2015. Even with the Icelandic footage, it was more work creating the in-game environment for Sullust than for other planets, like Tatooine, Hoth, and Endor, all of which had real-world counterparts seen in the films. 
  46. ^ Hidalgo 2015, pp. 74–75.
  47. ^ Blauvelt, Christian (2010-09-25). "'Star Wars: The Clone Wars' recap: It's 1999 all over again!". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  48. ^ Blauvelt, Christian (2011-04-02). "Star Wars: The Clone Wars season finale recap: I am Wookiee, hear me roar!". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
  49. ^ Jones, Jason (October 28, 2011). "This week in The Clone Wars: The shadow planet of Umbara". Wired. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  50. ^ a b Brennan, Pat; Clavin, Whitney (December 15, 2015). "Meanwhile, in a galaxy not so far, far away...". NASA. Retrieved December 15, 2015. 

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]