George "Mojo" Buford

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George "Mojo" Buford
Birth name George Buford
Born (1929-11-10)November 10, 1929
Hernando, Mississippi, United States
Died October 11, 2011(2011-10-11) (aged 81)
Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
Genres Blues
Instruments Harmonica
Years active Early 1950s–2011
Labels Various

George "Mojo" Buford (November 10, 1929 – October 11, 2011) was an American blues harmonica player best known for his work in Muddy Waters's band.

Biography[edit]

Buford relocated from Hernando, Mississippi, to Memphis, Tennessee, in his youth, where he studied the blues.[1] He relocated to Chicago in 1952,[2] forming the Savage Boys, which eventually was known as the Muddy Waters, Jr. Band. They substituted for Waters at local nightclubs while he was touring.[1]

Buford first played in Waters's backing band in 1959, replacing Little Walter, but in 1962 moved to Minneapolis to front his own band and to record albums.[1] In Minneapolis he gained the nickname Mojo, because of audiences requesting him to perform his cover version of "Got My Mojo Working."[3] Buford returned to Waters's combo in 1967 for a year, replacing James Cotton.[3] He had a longer tenure with Waters in the early 1970s and returned for the final time after Jerry Portnoy departed to form the Legendary Blues Band.[1]

He also recorded for the Mr. Blues label. These recordings were later reissued by Rooster Blues, Blue Loon Records, and the British JSP label.[1]

Buford died on October 11, 2011, in Minneapolis, after a long hospitalization.[1][4] He was 81.

Discography[edit]

  • Exciting Harmonica Sound of Mojo Buford (BluesRecordSoc, 1963)
  • Mojo Buford's Chicago Blues Summit (Rooster Blues, 1979)
  • State of the Blues Harp (JSP, 1989)
  • Harpslinger (Blue Loon, 1993)
  • Still Blowin' Strong (Blue Loon, 1996)
  • Home Is Where My Harps Is (Blue Loon, 1998)
  • Champagne & Reefer (Fedora Records, 1999)
  • Blues Ain't a Color (Kpnbeat, 2005)[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Bill Dahl. "George "Mojo" Buford | Biography". AllMusic. Retrieved 2014-01-26. 
  2. ^ Russell, Tony (1997). The Blues: From Robert Johnson to Robert Cray. Dubai: Carlton Books. p. 96. ISBN 1-85868-255-X. 
  3. ^ a b "George Mojo Buford, a Mississippi musician". Mswritersandmusicians.com. 1929-11-10. Retrieved 2014-01-26. 
  4. ^ "Mojo Buford, former Muddy Waters harmonica player, has passed". Ameriblues.com. Retrieved October 11, 2011. 
  5. ^ "George "Mojo" Buford | Discography". AllMusic. Retrieved 2014-01-26. 

External links[edit]