George Evans (VC)

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George Evans
George Evans (VC).jpg
George Evans grave at Beckenham Cemetery
Born (1876-02-16)16 February 1876
Kensington, Middlesex, England
Died 28 September 1937(1937-09-28) (aged 61)
Anerley, Kent, England
Buried at Elmers End Cemetery, Beckenham
Allegiance  United Kingdom
Service/branch  British Army
Years of service 1894 - 1902, 1915 - ?
Rank Company Sergeant-Major
Unit
Battles/wars
Awards Victoria Cross
Other work NSPCC Inspector

George Evans VC (16 February 1876 – 28 September 1937) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

Evans first joined the Scots Guards in March 1894, and served during the Second Boer War. He left the Army in August 1902, to work for the NSPCC, and rejoined in January 1915. When he was 40 years old, and a Company Sergeant-Major in the 18th Battalion (3rd Manchester Pals), The Manchester Regiment of the British Army during the First World War, Evans was awarded the Victoria Cross for his deeds on 30 July 1916 during the Battle of the Somme at Guillemont, France:

Company Sergeant-Major Evans volunteered to take back an important message after five runners had been killed in attempting to do so. He had to cover about 700 yards, the whole of which was under observation from the enemy. He succeeded in delivering the message in spite of being wounded, and then rejoined his company despite having been advised to go to the dressing station. The return journey had again meant facing 700 yards of severe rifle and machine-gun fire, but by dodging from shell-hole to shell-hole he managed it.[1][2]

Evans was captured following his VC action, and spent the rest of the war as a POW. His Victoria Cross, gazetted in January 1920, was the last to be gazetted for the First World War.

He died on 28 September 1937 and was buried in Beckenham Crematorium and Cemetery.[3]

His VC is held at the Imperial War Museum in London.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "No. 31759". The London Gazette (Supplement). 27 January 1920. p. 1217. 
  2. ^ Lewisham War Memorials
  3. ^ Findagrave.com

External links[edit]