George Ewing Martin

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George Ewing Martin
Senior Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia
In office
September 30, 1937 – April 14, 1948
Chief Justice of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia
In office
May 22, 1924 – September 30, 1937
Appointed byCalvin Coolidge
Preceded byConstantine Joseph Smyth
Succeeded byDuncan Lawrence Groner
Presiding Judge of the United States Court of Customs Appeals
In office
January 4, 1923 – May 24, 1924
Appointed byWarren G. Harding
Preceded byMarion De Vries
Succeeded byWilliam J. Graham
Associate Judge of the United States Court of Customs Appeals
In office
February 8, 1911 – January 4, 1923
Appointed byWilliam Howard Taft
Preceded byWilliam Henry Hunt
Succeeded byCharles Sherrod Hatfield
Personal details
Born
George Ewing Martin

(1857-11-23)November 23, 1857
Lancaster, Ohio
DiedApril 14, 1948(1948-04-14) (aged 90)
Washington, D.C.
EducationUniversity of Heidelberg
Wittenberg University (A.B.)
read law

George Ewing Martin (November 23, 1857 – April 14, 1948) was the Chief Justice of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia and previously was an Associate Judge and later the Presiding Judge of the United States Court of Customs Appeals.

Education and career[edit]

Born in Lancaster, Ohio, Martin attended the University of Heidelberg in the German Empire and received an Artium Baccalaureus degree from Wittenberg College (now Wittenberg University) in 1877. He read law to enter the bar in 1883, and was in private practice in Lancaster from 1883 to 1904. He was a Judge of the Ohio Court of Common Pleas for the 7th Judicial District from 1904 to 1911.[1]

Federal judicial service[edit]

Martin was nominated by President William Howard Taft on February 1, 1911, to an Associate Judge seat on the United States Court of Customs Appeals (later the United States Court of Customs and Patent Appeals) vacated by Associate Judge William Henry Hunt. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on February 8, 1911, and received his commission the same day. His service terminated on January 4, 1923, due to his elevation to Presiding Judge of the same court.[1]

Martin was nominated by President Warren G. Harding on December 28, 1922, to the Presiding Judge seat on the United States Court of Customs Appeals (later the United States Court of Customs and Patent Appeals) vacated by Presiding Judge Marion De Vries. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on January 4, 1923, and received his commission the same day. His service terminated on May 24, 1924, due to appointment to the Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia.[1]

Martin was nominated by President Calvin Coolidge on May 16, 1924, to the Chief Justice seat on the Court of Appeals of the District of Columbia (United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia from June 7, 1934, now the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit) vacated by Chief Justice Constantine Joseph Smyth. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on May 22, 1924, and received his commission the same day. He assumed senior status on September 30, 1937. His service terminated on April 14, 1948, due to his death in Washington, D.C.[1]

References[edit]

Sources[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
William Henry Hunt
Associate Judge of the United States Court of Customs Appeals
1911–1923
Succeeded by
Charles Sherrod Hatfield
Preceded by
Marion De Vries
Presiding Judge of the United States Court of Customs Appeals
1923–1924
Succeeded by
William J. Graham
Preceded by
Constantine Joseph Smyth
Chief Justice of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia
1924–1937
Succeeded by
Duncan Lawrence Groner