George Franklin Pawling

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George Franklin Pawling
Pawling 3819815813 81ee0db0d3 o.jpg
President of the Amateur Athletic Union
In office
1910–1911
Succeeded by Gustavus Town Kirby
Personal details
Born (1879-04-16)April 16, 1879
Lewistown, Pennsylvania
Died December 2, 1954(1954-12-02) (aged 75)
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

George Franklin Pawling (April 16, 1879 - December 2, 1954), was President of the Amateur Athletic Union in the 1910s and the builder of the Philadelphia Arena in the 1920s.[1]

Biography[edit]

Pawling was born on April 16, 1879 in Lewistown, Pennsylvania. He attended the Central Manual Training School of Philadelphia and graduated in 1896. He went to work for the Pencoyd Iron Works from 1896 to 1900, taking courses in their School of Instruction in Engineering. He studied engineering in Temple College in Philadelphia. He then worked for the New York Shipbuilding in 1901 to 1902 in charge of the detailing of hulls. From 1903 to 1905 he was the assistant engineer at the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company where he designed the Market Street Elevated Railway. From 1906 to 1907 he was a contracting engineer for the Belmont Iron Works.[2][3]

He died on December 2, 1954 at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "G. F. Pawling Headed Construction Firm". New York Times. December 3, 1954. Retrieved 2009-08-18. George F. Pawling, engineer, builder and amateur sports official, died last night in Jefferson Hospital here at the age of 75. ... 
  2. ^ George Franklin Pawling in the World War I draft registration
  3. ^ "George F. Pawling & Co.". America's Maritime Progress. 1920. George F. Pawling, its founder, was born in Lewiston, Pa., April 16, 1879. He was graduated from the Central Manual Training School of Philadelphia in 1896. He was employed by the Pencoyd Iron Works, 1896 to 1900, taking the course in that company's School of Instruction in Engineering, and also studied, engineering in Temple College, Philadelphia. He went with the New York Shipbuilding Co., was engaged in detailing, checking and in charge of detail work and designing, 1901-1902, and in responsible charge of detailing of hulls. From 1903 to 1905 he was assistant engineer of the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company, in charge of preparation of design for the Market Street Elevated Railway, and in 1906-1907 was contracting engineer for the Belmont Iron Works, in designing, constructing and construction work. ...