George Freeman (guitarist)

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Jazz guitarist George Freeman performing at the 2008 Chicago Jazz Festival

George Freeman (born April 10, 1927) is an American jazz guitarist born in Chicago.

By mid-1947, Freeman was a member of a sextet led by Johnny Griffin and Joe Morris[1] and supporting touring musicians such as Lester Young and Charlie Parker. He recorded with Parker for the Savoy label.[2]

In the mid-1950s, he started a long association with organist Richard "Groove" Holmes, appearing as sideman and song contributor on Holmes' World Pacific and Prestige.

After touring with Gene Ammons and Shirley Scott, Freeman decided against any more road work and has been based in Chicago.[2]

He is the brother of tenor saxophonist Von Freeman and drummer Eldridge "Bruz" Freeman[2] and the uncle of Chico Freeman.[3] George and Von collaborated frequently throughout their careers.

His debut solo album, Birth Sign (1969), featured saxophonist Kalaparusha Maurice McIntyre and organist Sonny Burke.[2]

Other musicians he has worked with include[2] Ben Webster, Illinois Jacquet, Sonny Stitt, Sonny Criss, Charles Earland, Jimmy McGriff, Les McCann, Eldee Young, Harold Mabern, Kenny Barron, Bob Cranshaw, Buddy Williams, Kurt Elling, Red Holloway, Corey Wilkes, and the Deep Blue Organ Trio.

Discography[edit]

  • Birth Sign (Delmark, 1969)
  • Introducing George Freeman Live With Charlie Earland Sitting In (Giant Step, 1971)
  • Franticdiagnosis (Bam-Boo, 1972)
  • New Improved Funk (Groove Merchant, 1972)
  • Concert 'Friday the 13th' Cook County Jail (Groove Merchant, 1973) - with Jimmy McGriff + Lucky Thompson + O'Donel Levy
  • Man & Woman (Groove Merchant, 1974)
  • All in the Game (LRC, 1977)
  • Rebellion (Southport, 1995)
  • George Burns (Orchard, 1999)
  • At Long Last George (Savant, 2001)

As sideman[edit]

With Gene Ammons

With Richard "Groove" Holmes

With Les McCann

With Shirley Scott

With Buddy Rich

  • The Last Blues Album" (Groove Merchant, 1974)

References[edit]