George H. King

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George Herbert King
Judge George H. King.jpg
Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California
In office
September 14, 2012 – June 30, 2016
Preceded by Audrey B. Collins
Succeeded by Virginia A. Phillips
Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California
In office
June 30, 1995 – January 6, 2017
Appointed by Bill Clinton
Preceded by Seat established by 104 Stat. 5089
Succeeded by vacant
Personal details
Born George Herbert King
1951 (age 66–67)
Shanghai, China
Education UCLA (B.A.)
USC Gould School of Law (J.D.)

George Herbert King (born 1951) is a former United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California.

Education and career[edit]

King was born in Shanghai, China. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1971 and a Juris Doctor from the USC Gould School of Law at the University of Southern California in 1974. He was in private practice in Los Angeles, California from 1974 to 1975. He was an Assistant United States Attorney for the Central District of California from 1975 to 1979. King returned to private practice from 1979 to 1986. At the same time, he acted as a hearing examiner for the Los Angeles Police Commission from 1980 to 1982.

Federal judicial service[edit]

In 1987, King became a United States Magistrate Judge for the Central District of California. On April 27, 1995, President Bill Clinton nominated King to be a United States District Judge for the United States District Court for the Central District of California, to a new seat created by 104 Stat. 5089. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on June 30, 1995, and received his commission the same day. He served as Chief Judge from September 14, 2012 to June 30, 2016. He retired on January 6, 2017.

Notable case[edit]

In perhaps his most famous ruling, King granted summary judgment in the case of Rupa Marya v. Warner/Chappell Music Inc. in favor of the plaintiffs, holding that defendants had no valid copyright in the song Happy Birthday, in a decision filed September 22, 2015.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mai-Duc, Christine (September 23, 2015). "All the 'Happy Birthday' song copyright claims are invalid, federal judge rules". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 23, 2015. 

Sources[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Seat established by 104 Stat. 5089
Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California
1995–2017
Vacant
Preceded by
Audrey B. Collins
Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the Central District of California
2012–2016
Succeeded by
Virginia A. Phillips