George Hay (Virginia)

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George Hay
Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia
In office
1825–1830
Appointed by John Quincy Adams
Succeeded by Philip Pendleton Barbour

George Hay (December 17, 1765 – September 21, 1830) was a United States federal judge.

Born in Williamsburg, Virginia, Hay read law to enter the bar, and was in private practice in Petersburg, Virginia, from 1787 to 1801, then in Richmond, Virginia, until 1803. He was a U.S. Attorney for the District of Virginia from 1803 to 1816, and served as prosecutor in the trial of Aaron Burr. He was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates from 1816 to 1822, returning to private practice in Washington, D.C., from 1822 to 1825.[1] He was married to Eliza Kortright Monroe, the daughter of President James Monroe.

On July 5, 1825, Hay received a recess appointment from John Quincy Adams to a seat on the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia vacated by St. George Tucker. Formally nominated on December 13, 1825, Hay was confirmed by the United States Senate on March 31, 1826, and received his commission the same day. He served until his death, in Richmond, Virginia.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "O Say Can You See: Early Washington, D.C., Law & Family". earlywashingtondc.org. Retrieved 2015-10-12. 
Legal offices
Preceded by
new seat
Judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia
1825–1830
Succeeded by
Philip Pendleton Barbour

Sources[edit]