George McLean (New Zealand politician)

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Sir George McLean (1834 – 17 February 1917) was a 19th-century Member of Parliament from the Otago region in New Zealand.

Biography[edit]

New Zealand Parliament
Years Term Electorate Party
1871–1872 5th Waikouaiti Independent
1875 5th Waikouaiti Independent
1875–1879 6th Waikouaiti Independent
1879–1881 7th Waikouaiti Independent

McLean owned Matanaka Farm near Waikouaiti from February 1878 until 1892.[1]

He represented the Waikouaiti electorate from 1871 to 1872 when he resigned, and from an 1875 by-election to 1881 when he retired.[2]

McLean held several ministerial appointments under Vogel and Atkinson: Postmaster-General and Commissioner of Telegraphs from 1 to 13 September 1876 and 12 January to 13 October 1877. He was Collector of Customs from 1 September 1876 to 13 October 1877 and (as a MLC) Commissioner of Trade and Customs from 28 August to 3 September 1884.

On 19 December 1881, he was appointed to the New Zealand Legislative Council and remained a member until his death on 17 February 1917.[3]

He was knighted in 1909.[2] He had married a daughter of Matthew Holmes.[4] His daughter Georgia Constance McLean married Thomas Wilford in 1892.[5] His brother-in-law, the solicitor John White, unsuccessfully contested the Waikouaiti electorate in the 1899 election.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Matanaka Farm". Register of Historic Places. Heritage New Zealand. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. p. 217. OCLC 154283103. 
  3. ^ Scholefield, Guy (1950) [First ed. published 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1949 (3rd ed.). Wellington: Govt. Printer. p. 80. 
  4. ^ "Death of a True Colonist". The Southland Times (15057). 28 September 1901. p. 2. Retrieved 6 April 2014. 
  5. ^ Butterworth, Susan. "Wilford, Thomas Mason - Biography". Dictionary of New Zealand Biography. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 17 December 2011. 
  6. ^ "Otago". The Star (6661). 6 December 1899. p. 4. Retrieved 8 March 2014.