George V. Voinovich Bridges

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George V. Voinovich Bridge westbound
Photograph of completed bridge
The eastbound bridge, shortly after completion, September 2016
Coordinates 41°29′10″N 81°41′24″W / 41.4861°N 81.69°W / 41.4861; -81.69
Carries I-90 (Innerbelt Freeway)
Crosses

US 422 / SR 8 / SR 14 / SR 43 / SR 87 (Ontario Street/Broadway Avenue)
RTA Rapid Transit Red Line
Cuyahoga River

Norfolk Southern Railway
Locale Cleveland, Ohio
Owner ODOT
Maintained by ODOT
Characteristics
Material Steel, concrete
Total length 4,347 feet (1,325 m)
Height 136 feet (41 m)
History
Designer HNTB Ohio
Engineering design by Walsh Construction
Construction start March 30, 2011
Construction cost $293 million
Inaugurated November 8, 2013
Opened November 9, 2013
Replaces Innerbelt Bridge
George V. Voinovich Bridges is located in Ohio
George V. Voinovich Bridges
George V. Voinovich Bridges
Location in Ohio
References
[1][2][3][4]
George V. Voinovich Bridge eastbound
Coordinates 41°29′N 81°41′W / 41.49°N 81.69°W / 41.49; -81.69Coordinates: 41°29′N 81°41′W / 41.49°N 81.69°W / 41.49; -81.69
Carries I-90
Crosses

Norfolk Southern Railway
Cuyahoga River
RTA Rapid Transit Red Line

US 422 / SR 8 / SR 14 / SR 43 / SR 87 (Ontario Street/Broadway Avenue)
Locale Cleveland, Ohio
Owner ODOT
Maintained by ODOT
Characteristics
Total length 3,918 feet (1,194 m)
Height 136 feet (41 m)
History
Designer URS Corporation
Engineering design by Trumbull Corporation, The Great Lakes Construction Company, & The Ruhlin Company (TGR)
Construction cost $273 million
Inaugurated September 24, 2016
Opened September 24, 2016
Replaces Innerbelt Bridge
References
[4][5][6][7]

The George V. Voinovich Bridges are two bridges in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., that carry Interstate 90 (I-90, Innerbelt Freeway) over the Cuyahoga River. They are named for George Voinovich, former mayor of Cleveland, Governor of Ohio, and United States Senator.

The bridges' 200-foot (61 m) piles are the largest ever manufactured in the United States.[8]

Predecessor[edit]

The bridges were conceived as part of the Innerbelt Freeway rebuild to replace the 1959 Innerbelt Bridge, and the schedule of the project to build them was accelerated due to the deteriorating condition of the Innerbelt Bridge.[9]

Westbound bridge[edit]

The westbound bridge was built immediately to the north of the Innerbelt Bridge. Construction on this bridge began on March 30, 2011,[1] with a ceremonial groundbreaking following on May 2.[10][11] It opened to Ontario Street ramp traffic on November 9, 2013,[12] had opened to other ramp traffic and I-90 westbound mainline traffic by November 17,[13] and opened to eastbound traffic, which used the westbound bridge until the completion of the eastbound bridge, on November 23.[14] The bridge was dedicated to George Voinovich during the ribbon-cutting ceremony on November 8, 2013.[2]

Eastbound bridge[edit]

The eastbound bridge was built in the former location of the Innerbelt Bridge.[4] Early in the project, the proposed date of completion varied widely.[15][16][17][18][19] Construction on the bridge had begun by November 3, 2014;[20] the bridge opened in limited capacity the evening of September 24, 2016[7] after a ribbon-cutting ceremony earlier in the day,[6] opening in full on October 24.[21] This bridge was named for George Voinovich prior to the naming of the westbound bridge.[22]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Breckenridge, Tom (March 30, 2011). "Inner Belt Bridge Construction Begins as Massive Supports are Hammered into Bedrock". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland. Retrieved March 31, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Grant, Alison (November 8, 2013). "Inner Belt Bridge Brings Crowd of Onlookers with Cameras, Babies in Strollers". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland. Retrieved November 9, 2013. 
  3. ^ District 12 (January 10, 2011). "Cleveland City Planning Commission Approves Innerbelt Bridge Aesthetic Details" (Press release). Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved November 10, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c "Frequently Asked Questions". Ohio Department of Transportation. 
  5. ^ District 12 (September 13, 2013). "Apparent Winning Team for Historic Bridge Construction Revealed" (Press release). Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved November 10, 2013. 
  6. ^ a b Ewinger, James (September 24, 2016). "Voinovich family dedicates eastbound Innerbelt span". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland. Retrieved September 25, 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Ohio Department of Transportation District 12 [@ODOT_Innerbelt] (September 24, 2016). "Those fireworks in the background are probably for the @Indians, however it could also be to let you know the EB bridge is open to traffic!" (Tweet) – via Twitter. 
  8. ^ Grant, Alison (April 20, 2015). "See what's going on with the Inner Belt Bridge project during ODOT's public tours". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland. Retrieved April 21, 2015. 
  9. ^ "Project Overview". Ohio Department of Transportation. Archived from the original on November 10, 2013. 
  10. ^ Freeman, Kevin (May 2, 2011). "New Innerbelt Bridge to Connect, Improve Communities". Cleveland: WJW-TV. Archived from the original on July 25, 2011. Retrieved May 3, 2011. 
  11. ^ District 12 (May 2, 2011). "Innerbelt Bridge Ceremonial Groundbreaking Held Today" (Press release). Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 10, 2011. 
  12. ^ Volante, Monica (November 9, 2013). "Innerbelt Bridge Open in Both Directions". Cleveland: WJW-TV. Retrieved November 10, 2013. 
  13. ^ Ohio Department of Transportation District 12 [@ODOT_Innerbelt] (November 17, 2013). "Attention Motorists: I-90 west is open and as of 8a this morning, westbound traffic is on the NEW #Innerbelt..." (Tweet). Retrieved July 24, 2015 – via Twitter. 
  14. ^ District 12 (November 23, 2013). "Interstate 90 Now OPEN: All Traffic on NEW Innerbelt Bridge!" (Press release). Ohio Department of Transportation. Retrieved November 24, 2013. 
  15. ^ Farkas, Karen (December 1, 2009). "Construction of new Inner Belt Bridge likely will cause traffic tie-ups for many years". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland. Retrieved December 1, 2009. 
  16. ^ Breckenridge, Tom (January 17, 2012). "Cleveland's Business, Traffic Would Suffer if 2nd Inner Belt Bridge is Delayed a Decade, Officials Say". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland. Retrieved January 19, 2012. 
  17. ^ Breckenridge, Tom (January 29, 2012). "Funding for Second Inner Belt Bridge Could Take a Back Seat to Statewide Projects". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland. Retrieved January 31, 2012. 
  18. ^ Amigo, Elisa (June 6, 2012). "Innerbelt Bridge Project Moved up to 2016". Cleveland: WJW-TV. Retrieved June 7, 2012. 
  19. ^ Breckenridge, Tom (June 6, 2012). "Cleveland's 2nd Inner Belt Bridge Could Be Built 7 Years Earlier than Expected". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland. Retrieved June 7, 2012. 
  20. ^ Fong, Marvin (November 3, 2014). "Second Inner Belt bridge work continues in Cleveland (slideshow)". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland. Retrieved December 19, 2014. 
  21. ^ Christ, Ginger (October 24, 2016). "Inner Belt Bridge is completely open today". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland. Retrieved October 24, 2016. 
  22. ^ Ohio Revised Code 5533.359

External links[edit]